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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 9 5 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
rks of the enemy. Moving through a dense forest to an open field the enemy was encountered in a thicket beyond. I ordered an assault, which was made with great energy and gallantry by both brigades. The position of the enemy was very strong and the approach almost impassable in consequence of a dense growth of small bushes. The Second Brigade reached the works at the first dash and captured many prisoners. They would have held the works and gone on but for the unfortunate loss of Capt. L. M. Kellogg, commanding the Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, who was on the extreme right. He was badly wounded while crossing the works. The enemy brought up re-enforcements and compelled the right to fall back about 100 yards. A portion of this brigade gallantly clung to the works till overpowered and captured. When preparing to reform the Second Brigade for another charge, I received information from General Davis that he had ordered Colonel Este's brigade, of Baird's division, to support me. As
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
m his rifle-pits, capturing a large number of prisoners, and advancing our line to within 150 yards of the enemy's main line of works. Here works were thrown up at night, and the position held until our army made its grand movement to the right, on the night of the 26th of August. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct displayed by the officers and men in this engagement. It was as severe as any of the campaign, and right well and nobly did the forces engaged sustain themselves. Capt. L. M. Kellogg, commanding the Eighteenth; Capt. Horace Jewett, commanding the First Battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, and Capt. W. S. McManus, commanding the Second Battalion, Fifteenth, are entitled to be mentioned with special commendation for their bravery and for the skill with which theyhandled their commands. Capt. James Curtis, who had been in command of the First Battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, was struck in the mouth with a musket-ball just before the Fifteenth advanced. I respectfully refe
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 110 (search)
re 2 valuable officers were lost to the command, Capt. M. L. Ogden and Lieut. J. 1. Adair, the former from disease caused by exposure and the latter by a wound in the neck. Lieutenant Burrowes joined. On the 6th of June the command marched toward Big Shanty, near which point Capt. P. R. Forney (sick) was permitted to go to the rear to await the acceptance of his resignation. On the 10th of June the command marched five miles and rested until the 14th, when it marched two miles. Capt. L. M. Kellogg joined and assumed command, I retaining the command of the First Battalion. From the 14th to the 20tfi was spent intrenching and skirmishing on the left of Kenesaw Mountain. On the 22d the battalion relieved a regiment of General Whitaker's brigade. SNo other changes than those of alternating from first to second line were made until the 2d of July; a slight advance. On the 3d marched through Marietta. On the 4th I was placed in command of four companies Eighteenth Infantry, five
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
ommanded as follows: First company, commanded by Capt. Robert B. Hull; second company, commanded by Lieut. James S. Ostrander; third company, commanded by First Sergt. William W. Bell; fourth company, commanded by Lieut. James Powell; fifth company, commanded by Lieut. Reuben F. Little; sixth company, commanded by First Sergt. William Gordon; seventh company, commanded by Lieut. Orrin E. Davis; eighth company, commanded by Lieut. Thomas B. Burrowes; the whole detachment commanded by Capt. L. M. Kellogg; Lieut. William H. Bisbee being detachment adjutant. The detachment left camp at 7 a. m., marching with the Second (or regular) Brigade, the first company, commanded by Capt. Robert B. Hull, acting as flankers and skirmishers. The flankers struck the enemy's line of skirmishers about noon, and the brigade immediately deployed and formed line of battle. The first company, acting as skirmishers, was then withdrawn and placed in line. The detachment advanced with the brigade in line
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 113 (search)
permit his wound to interfere with his duties but for a few days. The rifle-pits having been captured by the skirmish line, Dilger's battery was ordered forward, and the battalion advanced to its support under a terrible artillery fire, which was kept up during the entire day. On the 5th the enemy fell back to the Chattahoochee River, and the battalion went into position near Vining's Station. Here the battalions of the detachment, being consolidated into one, under the command of Capt. L. M. Kellogg, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, I resumed command of my company, and, having soon after received the appointment of acting assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, am unable to report further the operations of my battalion. I cannot close, however, without mentioning my very efficient adjutant, Lieut. Frederick Phisterer, for his invaluable service and for the gallantry and zeal which he always manifested in the performance of his duties; and to the officers and men of the command I
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
e enemy thought to strike him before we got up. The enemy had strong rifle-pits and works, and Johnston had published an order to his troops saying that he would make his fight there; this the night before we arrived. M-ay 20.-6 a. inm., Captain Kellogg, aide-de-camp, brought instructions from Major-General Thomas to have this corps rest in its present position to-day, and to supply ourselves with ten days rations (three in haversacks and seven in wagons) from to-morrow. Orders were at oncew line of battle. Our right joins Baird's left near the Decatur road, crosses the road, and runs in a direction facing a little north of east. Our line refuses and crosses the Decatur road a short distance from Baird's left. 5.45 p. m., Captain Kellogg, aide-decamp, General Thomas' staff, informed General Stanley that his line was not as he desired it. He wishes two divisions to run along the Decatur road on the other side of it. 6.15 p. m., General Thomas directed General Stanley to remai