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Execution to-day. --Spencer Kellogg, a Yankee spy, captured about thirteen months since at Island No.10, will be hung at Camp Lee to-day, between the hours of nine and two o'clock. Every preparation was made yesterday for his execution, and there is little doubt but that this criminal will expiate his crime on the gallows at the appointed time.
The Daily Dispatch: September 26, 1863., [Electronic resource], One hundred and Seventy-five dollars reward. (search)
Execution of a spy. --Pursuant to a notice published in the Dispatch, Spencer Kellogg, the Yankee deserter and spy, was hung at Camp Lee yesterday afternoon. Aarriage, and great curiosity was manifested to get a glimpse at the prisoner. Kellogg sat resting his head the most of the time on his hand. In stature he was abouh the unfortunate man manifested much emotion. The prayer being through with, Kellogg soon after ascended the platform of the gallows, and placing his hands behind d," After doing this, and when the rope was about being placed over his neck. Kellogg took off his hat to permit its proper adjustment. This he sailed lightly off p, began to draw it through, till, getting it within about a foot of his neck, Kellogg interrupted him with the words, "I want more fall than that; one foot, doctor, prepared for his remains. Thus ended the career of this misled fanatic. Kellogg's demeanor during the whole time was self-possessed, and apparently free from
The Daily Dispatch: October 12, 1863., [Electronic resource], Farewell address of Lieut.-Gen'l Leonidas Polk. (search)
The recent execution of a spy. --Admiral Porter is out in a letter in the Philadelphia Inquirer, in which he states that Spencer Kellogg, recently executed in Richmond as a spy, was Spencer Kellogg Brown, a son of Orvill Brown, and grandson of the famous John Brown. He avers that he was one of the most intelligent warrant officers in the U. S. Navy, and that he was not a spy. Brown will be recollected by the citizens of Charlestown as the young grandson of John Brown who came on to that town with Mrs. Brown before her husband's execution. Orvill Brown, the father of the spy; was killed in the melee at the Harper's Ferry arsenal.
Farewell letter of Kellogg, the spy. --The Philadelphia Inquirer publishes the following letter of Spencer Kellogg the spy, who was executed here, to his parents in that city: Castle Thunder, Va., Sept. 23, 1863. Dear Father --By permission, and through the courtesy of Capt. Alexander, I am on able to write you Spencer Kellogg the spy, who was executed here, to his parents in that city: Castle Thunder, Va., Sept. 23, 1863. Dear Father --By permission, and through the courtesy of Capt. Alexander, I am on able to write you a few lines. You who before this have heard from me in regard to my situation here, can, I trust, hear it when I tell you that my days on earth are soon ended. Last Saturday I was court martials, and this evening, a short time since, I received notice of my sentence, by Captain Alexander, who has since shown me every kindness conrespectfully to all my dear friends and relatives. Tell Kitty I hope to meet her again. Take care of Freddy for me; put him often in remembrance of me. Dear Mother — Good bye. God comfort you, my mother, and bless you with the love of happy children. Farewell, my father; we meet again by God's mercy. Spencer Kellogg.