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The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for John Kellogg or search for John Kellogg in all documents.

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els John I. Gregg and Smith. the Appomattox campaign. organization of the cavalry command on the morning of March 31, 1865. Major-General Philip H. Sheridan. Captain Thomas W. C. Moore, Aide-de-camp. Captain Michael V. Sheridan, Aide-de-camp. principal staff-officers: Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Forsyth, Chief-of-Staff. Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick C. Newhall, Adjutant-General. Colonel Frank T. Sherman, Inspector-General. Captain Andrew J. McGonnigle, Chief Quartermaster. Lieutenant-Colonel John Kellogg, Chief Commissary of Subsistence. Surgeon James T. Ghiselin, Medical Director. Captain George L. Gillespie, Chief Engineer. Captain Ocran H. Howard, Chief Signal Officer. Army of the Shanandoah. Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt. first division. Brigadier-General Thomas C. Devin. first brigade: Colonel Peter Stagg. First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel George R. Maxwell. Fifth Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel Smith H. Hastings. Sixth Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel Harvey H. Vinton
for the night. The enemy being thus checked, I sent a staff-officer-Captain Sheridan--to General Grant to report what had taken place during the afternoon, and to say that I proposed to stay at Dinwiddie, but if ultimately compelled to abandon the place, I would do so by retiring on the Vaughn road toward Hatcher's Run, for I then thought the attack might be renewed next morning. Devin and Davies joined me about dark, and my troops being now well in hand, I sent a second staff-officer-Colonel John Kellogg-to explain my situation more fully, and to assure General Grant that I would hold on at Dinwiddie till forced to let go. By following me to Dinwiddie the enemy's infantry had completely isolated itself, and hence there was now offered the Union troops a rare opportunity. Lee was outside of his works, just as we desired, and the general-in-chief realized this the moment he received the first report of my situation; General Meade appreciated it too from the information he got f