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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 74 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 1 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for William Pitt Kellogg or search for William Pitt Kellogg in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
soldiers of local name, on one side; and William P. Kellogg, a lawyer from Illinois, and Caesar C. A mark him as a man to carry out their plans. Kellogg was intriguing for the State senator's chair, ambition by the State appeared to lie within Kellogg's reach; but he required much strength and snd every planter of Louisiana at their side. Kellogg was a stranger in the city, having no other ft. Warmoth was trying a middle course. Like Kellogg, Warmoth is a stranger on the Gulf. His friecEnery there was likely to be disorder; under Kellogg there was certain to be anarchy. Unable tond unwilling to meet a chamber opened by him, Kellogg convened a meeting of his partisans. It was s to which of the two candidates, McEnery and Kellogg, was legally elected, to the judges of the Supreme Court. Kellogg feared alike the senators and the judges. But how was he to sweep them both Judge Durell's order gave the partisans of Kellogg an advantage over the citizens of Louisiana, [3 more...]
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. (search)
to his name. This man seemed worth his salt, and Kellogg came to terms with him. Pinch was to upset Warmoth.no pretension to the rank and office he assumed. Kellogg contrived that Pinch should be proposed as the repuPinch, as Pinch was unable to move without Packard, Kellogg threw himself on his patron, President Grant, and wand he handed the State House and the Great Seal to Kellogg; taking as his price the title of Governor, the Send by a lawful governor. Then the whole question of Kellogg's government came up. A good majority of the commitimpossible for serious men. The Senators found that Kellogg was not Governor of Louisiana; that his signature wwould have been glad, for party reasons, to support Kellogg and admit Pinchback; but the Senators were driven bmittee's report. The Senate not only declared that Kellogg was not the lawful Governor of Louisiana, and Pinchso as to ascertain whether General McEnery or William P. Kellogg was the popular choice; but he reserved to hi
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 3: White reaction. (search)
ared must go in favour of his enemies, and would weaken his hold on the Federal power. In spite, therefore, of having the support of Packard, the countenance of Pinch, the salary of a Governor, and an official residence in the State House, William P. Kellogg found his situation grow more desperate every passing day. New Orleans is Louisiana, very much as Paris is France. When New Orleans suffers, Louisiana suffers; when New Orleans recovers, Louisiana recovers. Now, under Kellogg and his other hold on the country than the support of an alien soldiery and a Negro mob. A resolution was carried that five citizens should proceed to the State House, in St. Louis Street, and in the name of a free and sovereign people, request William P. Kellogg, as a stranger in their city, to retire. Kellogg shut himself in his apartments, with his Negro guard, but sent out Billings and an officer of his staff to parley with his visitors. You ask the Governor to retire! said Billings, He ref
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 8: the Conservatives. (search)
find Governor McEnery, Lieutenant-governor Penn, and several Senators, who decline to sit with Kellogg's group, under the presidency of Caesar C. Antoine. A more courteous and decorous body of gent the scalawags. A Conservative Negro Club exists in every parish in Louisiana; and in spite of Kellogg's promise that every Negro voting the Grant ticket shall have forty acres and a good mule, thourisk except their skins, stand they are careful not to risk their skins. What can it matter to Kellogg and Packard, Antoine and Pinchback, whether property declines or not? We stake our all on peacisposition to oppose the general government, but that the opposition to the State government by Kellogg and Antoine cannot be put down.... The present State government cannot maintain itself in powersual pressure was put on coloured voters; Third: that many of the Negroes wish to get rid of Kellogg; Fourth: that the Returning Board was unlawfully constituted and made false returns; Fif
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 10: carpet-baggers. (search)
Chapter 10: carpet-baggers. William P. Kellogg's private secretary comes to the hotel to say that if we will pay a visit to the Legislature and Executive, Speaker Hahn and Governor Kellogg will be happy to receive us at the State House. In company of our consul, as before, we start for Royal Street, the entrance in St. Louis Street being still closed. After some parley with Negro soldiers and police we pass the door. A rush of foul air, the reek of bad cigars and worse liquors, drives us back. Phew! The hall is nearly dark, and gas is burning in one corner. Windows and doors are planked, and the floors strewn with corks, broken glass, stale crusts, and rotting bones. A crowd of loafers and officials throngs the hall, most of them Negroes, all of them smoking, jabbering, pushing. Here, a cotton picker wants to go upstairs and see dat legislating show. There, a carpet-bagger explains to a coloured voter why the Negro has not yet received his forty acres and a good mu
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Charleston. (search)
ers are required to sweep their own rooms and whitewash their own walls! Is that equality? Griffin is frank. Not having learned the art of wrapping up ugly things in golden words, he tells you that he wants to get his hands into the public chest. Affairs look smooth in Charleston; smoother than anyone would expect to find under a carpetbag Government, a Negro Legislature, and a Federal .army. Daniel H. Chamberlain, the Governor, is a New Englander, who came to Charleston as William P. Kellogg went to New Orleans, armed with a carpetbag, a pleasant manner, and an eloquent tongue. He has been long in power, and has been savagely abused by the Conservatives, not without good cause; but he is now changing his policy, curbing the excesses of his coloured friends, and listening more and more to the White minority. Such moderate Conservatives as Captain Walker and George A. Trenholm, are disposed to work with him, instead of speaking, voting, and caballing against him. Chamberla
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 18: at Washington. (search)
as a rule, who makes the row. You mean that the carpet-baggers, men like Kellogg and Chamberlain, make the rows? Not in our interest, but their own. Theseh, he bawls at me; cheated, sah. The Senators reject my papers! It is all dat Kellogg, sah! Has not Governor Kellogg signed your papers properly? Gubnor KelGovernor Kellogg signed your papers properly? Gubnor Kellogg! He gubnor! Dat Kellogg is a rascal, sah. He sign de papers all right; put big seal all right; den he write a letter underground, for de Republicans not to voKellogg! He gubnor! Dat Kellogg is a rascal, sah. He sign de papers all right; put big seal all right; den he write a letter underground, for de Republicans not to vote. He want to come hisself. He neber stay in New Orleans. Sah, Kellogg is de greatest big rascal in America! Pinch seems put out, the Senator remarks, but weKellogg is a rascal, sah. He sign de papers all right; put big seal all right; den he write a letter underground, for de Republicans not to vote. He want to come hisself. He neber stay in New Orleans. Sah, Kellogg is de greatest big rascal in America! Pinch seems put out, the Senator remarks, but we must draw the line somewhere. A sound party man, I draw a line at the penitentiary. It may seem singular, but I object to sitting on the next chair to a Senator wKellogg is de greatest big rascal in America! Pinch seems put out, the Senator remarks, but we must draw the line somewhere. A sound party man, I draw a line at the penitentiary. It may seem singular, but I object to sitting on the next chair to a Senator who has recently come out of jail. Emerging from the hall, and standing on the marble terrace looking over the Potomac towards the mountains of Virginia, I venture