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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. C. Kelly or search for D. C. Kelly in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
and had pushed their outposts into that mountain region itself, and in some cases eastward of the main range. Thus, General Kelly had captured Romney, the county seat of Hampshire, forty miles west of Winchester, and now occupied it with a force ncock, done what damage was possible to the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and placed himself between Lander at Hancock and Kelly at Romney, moved toward the latter place as fast as the icy roads would permit. While Jackson was on the road, a part of Kelly's force made a reconnoissance towards Winchester, and at Hanging Rock, twelve miles from Romney, surprised and defeated a force of Confederate militia, of some 500 or 600 men, taking two guns. But alarmed at Jackson's movements, Kelly did noKelly did not attempt to follow up the advantage, and hastily retired from Romney on January 10th. Jackson entered it on the 14th, and though the weather and roads grew worse held to his intention of advancing further. He aimed at Cumberland. Preparations we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
h pistol and sword — killing one and wounding two himself — continuing the chase for many miles, and leaving the road dotted with wounded and dead. His Major, a celebrated preacher and subsequently an equally celebrated Confederate Colonel, D. C. Kelly, saw him then for the first time under fire, and thus vividly describes the wonderful change that always took place in his appearance in a fight: His face flushed till it bore a striking resemblance to a painted Indian warrior's, and his eyes,Johnsonville. With all these efforts made to capture him, Forrest again made his escape. As soon as he reached the south side of the Tennessee river in safety, he turned on his pursuers, laid an ambuscade of about three hundred men, under Colonel Kelly, for the enemy attempting to land at Eastport, captured seventy-five prisoners, three pieces of rifled field artillery, sixty horses; sunk one gun and two caissons in the river, and drove a large number of the enemy into the river, many of wh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
ford. On the Rappahannock, above the union of the two streams, comes first Richards' ford, then Kelly's, which is some thirty miles from a point in Stafford opposite Fredericksburg — this well-knownord. Orders were issued by Stuart that the enemy be enveloped with pickets; that his route from Kelly's might at once be ascertained, and that his whole cavalry force of seven regiments be thrown in. On the 29th, the enemy not advancing towards the position of the cavalry between Brandy and Kelly's, Stuart knew he must be going elsewhere; so leaving one regiment, the Thirteenth Virginia, in position, he moved around with the remainder to get on the road from Kelly's to Germanna, and at Madden's, the intersection of the Stephensburg and Richards' ford with the Kelly's and Germanna road, ody of the enemy were passing up the river; on the forenoon of the 29th that they had crossed at Kelly's, and later, on same day, that they were marching on Chancellorsville. After reaching that poi