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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John B. Kelly or search for John B. Kelly in all documents.

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battery on the left. Though the enemy shelled us all the time while our batteries were getting into position, still we suffered very little. Our position now was a strong one. A range of high hills rises abruptly along the north side of the river, their wooded crest, and the little brick church peeping out of the foliage giving them a picturesque appearance. At their base runs the Rappahannock, while a little way up on the south side of the river are the mill and extensive concerns of Mr. Kelly, whose son is now enjoying free quarters in the Old Capitol. Our battery now occupied a sweeping range of the extensive plateau on the south side. Under shelter of the guns, which were vomiting forth shot and shell on them and forcing them back from the river, the working parties advanced to lay the pontoons. The First division, commanded by General Ward, was now massed, and the Third brigade ordered to lead the attack. They were commanded by Colonel de Trobriand, native of Britanny,
oss in killed and wounded was three hundred and seventy. The enemy now retreated to his old position, south of the Rapidan. The operations of our troops in West-Virginia are referred to here as being intimately connected with those of the army of the Potomac; the force being too small to attempt any important campaign by itself, has acted mostly upon the defensive, in repelling raids and in breaking up guerrilla bands. When Lee's army retreated across the Potomac, in July last, Brigadier-General Kelly concentrated all his available force on the enemy's flank, near Clear Springs, ready to cooperate in the proposed attack by General Meade; they also rendered valuable services in the pursuit after Lee had effected his passage of the river. On the twenty-fourth of July, Colonel Toland attacked the enemy at Wytheville, on the Eastern and Virginia Railroad, capturing two pieces of artillery, seven hundred muskets, and one hundred and twenty-five prisoners. Our loss was seventeen kille
idgeport at night of November thirteenth. I immediately telegraphed to the Commanding-General my arrival and the position of my several divisions, and was summoned to Chattanooga. I took the first boat during the night of the fourteenth for Kelly's, and rode into Chattanooga on the fifteenth. I then learned the post assigned me in the coming drama, was supplied with the necessary maps and information, and rode, during the sixteenth, in company with Generals Grant, Thomas, W. F. Smith, d my leading division (Ewing's) to march via Shell Mound to Trenton, demonstrate against Lookout Ridge, but to be prepared to turn quickly and follow me to Chattanooga, and in person I returned to Bridgeport, rowing a boat down the Tennessee from Kelly's, and immediately on arrival put in motion my division in the order they had arrived. The bridge of boats at Bridgeport was frail, and, though used day and night, our passage was slow, and the roads thence to Chattanooga were dreadfully cut u
the brains and right hand of Woolford's cavalry, declares that he will never believe another rebel, will take no more prisoners, and intends to fight against treason in this war and the next, and the one after that indefinitely. He rallied his boys, made a speech to them, and upon their return to the field nearly monopolized the fighting. Twenty-five men of the First Kentucky were killed and wounded. Among the number are Captain G. W. Drye, wounded; Lieutenant Phil. Roberts, wounded; Captain Kelly, killed; Lieutenant Cann, missing; Lieutenant Peyton, missing. Of the Forty-fifth Ohio, ninety-one were killed, wounded, and missing, among whom are Captain Jennings, wounded; Captain Ayler, wounded; Lieutenant Macbeth, wounded; Lieutenant Wiltshire, wounded; Lieutenant Mears, wounded. The conduct of the rebels was barbarous in the extreme. All prisoners, dead, and wounded were stripped. Four dead bodies of the Forty-fifth were found quite naked. One wounded officer, while unconsc
have fallen into my hands, could I have made a pursuit. I have now with me, as prisoners, five commissioned officers, among whom is the Inspector-General of General Kelly's division, a surgeon, and one hundred and twenty-six men of different regiments. Wheeler commanded in person, and it was reported to him, as the prisoners ly a few wagons over when it was found necessary to dig a new road in the railroad dyke. Whilst this was being done, Wheeler, with two divisions of cavalry, (Generals Kelly's and Preston's,) made a rush at the train. I immediately advanced my skirmishers, and silently formed my command in line of battle, covering completely, at ioned officers and one hundred and twenty-six men, killed (as far as I was able to learn during my brief stay) eleven rebels, wounded over thirty, amongst them General Kelly and Colonel Wade; and the number of small arms thrown away by the valiant warriors must amount to between three and four hundred. Being obliged to proceed u
burgh, and then making another raid on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. To meet a movement of this kind, General Kelly made all possible preparation. Yet as time wore away, and the weather continued fair, and the enemy gave no signs ofly date. On learning that this train had been attacked, and that the garrison at Petersburgh was again threatened, General Kelly ordered movements to be made in the most expeditious manner from Harper's Ferry and Martinsburgh. Of Sullivan's trooartially safely getting away, only in consequence of the columns from Martinsburgh and Harper's Ferry having defeated General Kelly's calculation by failing to reach Romney at six P. M. on the evening of the second. It was calculated that this colu valley again. Colonel Mulligan has been highly complimented for the alacrity with which he obeyed and carried out General Kelly's orders and the manner in which he personally conducted the pursuit. The other commanding officers have also been c
A. Matthewson. United States steamer Minnesota, off Newport news, Va., February 1, 1864. sir: I respectfully report, that in the engagement of this date with the rebel force at Smithfield, Va., the following persons, attached to the United States steamer Minnesota, were wounded: A. B. Pierson, Acting Master, by a musket-shot, producing severe flesh-wounds of the right-arm and chest; George Cook, ordinary seaman, by a musket-shot, producing flesh-wounds of left thigh and scrotum; John B. Kelly, seaman, by a sword-thrust in the abdomen, producing a serious wound; George Anderson, seaman, by musket-shot, producing flesh-wound of left hand. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Arthur Matthewson, Assistant-Surgeon United States Navy. Lieutenant Commander John H. Upshur, Commanding United States Steamer Minnesota. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, February 2. Shortly before dark, on Saturday, an expedition started from here, under the command of Brigad
elf in his saddle, without, however, inflicting a wound. Above the flag of his division is a white silk streamer, presented to him by members of his command, bearing the words: My God, my country, and General Hayes. The inscription is indorsed by the boys, among whom he is a great favorite. Captain J. C. Lynch, Acting Inspector-General of the division, had the top of his hat blown away by a shell during the engagement. General Kilpatrick, accompanied by battery C, Third artillery, Lieutenant Kelly, left camp at seven o'clock A. M. on Saturday morning, and, after several feints, crossed at Culpeper Mine Ford, where six rebel pickets belonging to Hampton's Legion were found posted. On crossing, detachments were sent out to scour the country in every direction. Colonel Alger, commanding the Fifth Michigan, was sent on the macadamized pike to Robertson's Tavern; while General Kilpatrick, with the main body, proceeded down the Fredericksburgh plank-road to the vicinity of Chancellor