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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 40 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for William Kelly or search for William Kelly in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

ss at Washington modified Crittenden Compromise adopted thereby Congress non-concurs failure to Compromise why. on the 31st of January, 1861, a Democratic State Convention, called to consider the impending peril of Disunion, assembled at Tweddle Hall, Albany. It was probably the strongest and most imposing assemblage of delegates ever convened within the State. Not less than thirty of them had been chosen to seats in Congress, while three Horatio Seymour, Amasa J. Parker, and William Kelly. of them had been Democratic candidates for Governor; one of them once elected, and since chosen again. Though called as Democratic, there was a large and most respectable representation of the old Whig party, with a number who had figured as Americans. No Convention which had nominations to make, or patronage to dispose of, was ever so influentially constituted. All sympathizing State officers and members of the Legislature were formally invited to participate in its deliberations.
d organized at Camp Carlile, in Ohio, opposite Wheeling, under the command of Col. Kelly, himself a Virginian. George B. McClellan, who had been appointed a Major-Geg read to those in Camp Carlile that evening, the 1st Virginia, 1,100 strong, Col. Kelly, crossed to Wheeling early next morning, closely followed by the 16th Ohio, Ce roads were bad, the night intensely dark and stormy, and the division under Col. Kelly, which had to make the longer march--twenty-two miles--did not, because it cowith infantry, when the dismayed Rebels, after a momentary resistance, fled. Col. Kelly's division came in at this instant, and fell upon the Rebels, who were utterly demoralized and dispersed. Col. Kelly received a severe wound from a pistol-shot through the lungs, and two Unionists were killed. The Rebels lost sixteen killed out the campaign in the southern part of West Virginia. In the north-east, Gen. Kelly, who held and guarded the Alleghany section of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroa
465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See John Brown, Border Ruffians, etc.) Kearsarge, U. S. Gunboat, blockades the Sumter at Gibraltar, 602. Keitt, Lawrence M., of S. C., an abettor of the assault on Sumner, 299; in Secession Convention, 345. Kelley, Col., of W. Va., in command of Camp Carlile, Ohio, 520; crosses to Wheeling, 522; is wounded at Philippi, 522; captures Romney, etc., 527. Kelly, William, at Tweddle Hall, 388. Kendall, Amos, to P. M. at Charleston, 129. Kentucky, 17; slave population in 1790, 36; unanimously devoted to Jefferson, etc., 83; the Resolutions of ‘98, 83; withdrawal of delegates from the Douglas Convention, 318; Magoffin elected Governor, 303; his course toward South Carolina, 340; the State remains in the Union, 349; population in 1860, 351; Legislature of, proposes a general Convention of the States, 897-403; her Governor's answer to the Presiden