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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
tive point of view, the regiment had no separate existence; there was no community of interest except in the companies among the men who were fed from the same camp-kettle. Note B, page 82. If any one wishes to form an idea of the irremediable demoralization that slavery entails, there is no necessity to read romances or pleadings, but only the simple diary kept in Georgia, on the plantation of her husband, by an author who bears a name illustrious in the dramatic annals of England, Miss Kemble. It is the naked truth, such as would strike an observer free from local prejudices; the astonishments and the hopes, even, expressed by the author, are evidences of her good faith. She was struck at first by the contrast between the magnificence of nature and the human wretchedness to be seen there. It was only by degrees, however, that she found out all the evils of which slavery was the source. Being seized with charitable enthusiasm at each sight of the picture, she wished to appl