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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 21 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 13 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Kemper or search for Kemper in all documents.

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the fire of barrel after barrel from a Federal cavalryman within ten paces of him, but fortunately sustained no injury. Having failed in this charge the enemy did not attempt another; the lines remained facing each other, and skirmishing, while the long thunder of the artillery beyond, indicated the hotter struggle of Cemetery Hill. Pickett's Virginians, we afterwards knew, were making their wild charge at that moment: advancing into that gulf of fire from which so few were to return; Kemper was being shot down; Armistead was falling as he leaped his horse over the Federal breastworks — the fate of Gettysburg was being decided. Night settled down, and still ignorant of the result, Stuart rode along the whole front where the sharpshooters were still firing. In the yard of a house there was a dead man lying, I remember, in a curious position — as men killed in battle often doand another blue sharpshooter, who had been summoned to advance and surrender, was staggering up with