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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 21 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 13 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Kemper or search for Kemper in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

ng about 200 men, the remnant of the fine body that left this city in April, 1861 is attached to Kemper's brigade, in Pickett's division of Long street's corps. It had been near Chambersburg doing pion time across the field, and not firing a musket until within a yards of the enemy's works. As Kemper's brigade moved up it swung around to the left and was exposed to the front fire and flanking fis and ran towards our men, giving themselves up as prisoners. Many of them ran entirely through Kemper's brigade to the rear. A good many of them were killed in running forward to surrender, our menlumn by regiments, was thrown out from the enemy's left on our extremes right, which was held by Kemper's brigade, and by an entrapping fire forced the requirement of our troops. This flanking party disorder. With their repulse the heavy fighting of the day terminated. Casualties. Gen. Kemper, whose gallantry has distinguished him on many a hard fought field, was struck whilst leading
on the way. Among the wounded, officers here are Major Generals Pender, Heth, Brig! Gens. G. T. Anderson, of Georgia, Scales, of North Carolina, and Jenkins. Gen. Hood was severely wounded in the arm by the fragment of a shell, but fortunately the wound does not endanger the arm. He was struck while going into action on the right, Thursday. Gen. Trimble lost the leg in which he was once wounded before. None of these officers, I am pleased to state, are seriously wounded. Gens. Garnett, Kemper, Armistead, and Barksdale are undoubtedly killed. The three first belonged to Pickett's division, which suffered most severely in General and field officers, and men — particularly in the second. I have said that we have no established information from the battle field since the close of the day's operations on Friday. But one report has prevailed however, of the proceeding Saturday and Sunday, and all who have left the field since Saturday morning agree in the statement. Such is the