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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. T. Kemper or search for J. T. Kemper in all documents.

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h Florida regiment; Major William H. Palmer, of the First Virginia regiment, (and son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the Seventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelliols, of Lynchburgh, slightly wounded. Capt. Irwin, of Scales's North-Carolina regiment, wounded. The First Virginia regiment was badly cut up. Out of two hundred men in the fight, some eighty or ninety are reported killed or wounded. Colonel Kemper's regiment suffered terribly, though we have no account of the extent of the casualties. We learn that Gen. Magruder has been for several days quite sick at Westover, on James River. The enemy had not occupied Jamestown at six o'clock o
of Smith, Longstreet, and Hill moved, I am satisfied that Keyes's corps would have been destroyed, instead of being merely defeated. Had it gone into action even at four o'clock, the victory would have been much more complete. Major-Generals Smith and Longstreet speak in high terms of the conduct of their superior and staff-officers. I beg leave to ask the attention of the government especially to the manner in which Brig.-Generals Whiting and R. H. Anderson, and Colonels Jenkins, and Kemper, and Hampton, exercising commands above their grades, and Brig.-Gen. Rhodes, are mentioned. This, and the captured colors, will be delivered by Major A. H. Cole, of my staff. I have been prevented by feebleness from making this report sooner, and am still too weak to make any but a very imperfect one. Several hundred prisoners were taken, but I have received no report of the number. Your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. Jefferson Davis's address. Executive off
en too sadly neglected in the North. There are several substantial brick and frame business-houses, all of which have been stripped and deserted. The names of firms were painted above the doors; they were, Terry & Duncan, Campbell & Dodds, J. T. Kemper, , and numerous others which it is unnecessary to designate. Mr. Kemper kept the Baltimore clothing Store, but neither he nor his clothing could be found. A druggist, whose name I have forgotten, determined to remain. Not enough of the CoMr. Kemper kept the Baltimore clothing Store, but neither he nor his clothing could be found. A druggist, whose name I have forgotten, determined to remain. Not enough of the Corinthians remained to welcome us, to give me any idea of what the mass of the citizens are like. A few poor persons, the druggist referred to, and the Mayor's clerk, and two or three wealthy females, were all that were to be found. The poor were nearly starved, and were disposed to welcome any change, as it might bring relief, but could not add to their suffering. They walked curiously around, observing the movements of the soldiers, astonished at the comparatively handsome uniform they wore,
picket-fight occurred. Later in the day the enemy were again encountered upon the York River Railroad, near a place called Savage's station; the troops engaged on our side being the division of Gen. McLaws, consisting of Gens. Kershaw and Semmes's brigades, supported by Gen. Griffith's brigade from Magruder's division. The Federals were found to be strongly intrenched, and as soon as our skirmishers came in view they were opened upon with a furious cannonade from a park of field-pieces. Kemper's battery now went to the front, and for three hours the battle raged hotly, when the discomfited Yankees again resumed their back track. It was during this fight that General Griffith, of Mississippi, one of the heroes of Leesburgh, (where he commanded the Eighteenth Mississippi, on the fall of Colonel Burt,) was killed by the fragment of a shell, which mangled one of his legs. He was the only general officer killed on our side during the whole of that bloody week. Owing to a most unfo
rriving in the cars, I thought if it could be done time would be gained by his being landed here rather than at Warrenton Junction. (Signed) Irwin McDowell, Major-General Commanding. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. United States military telegraph. Received August 26, 1862. From near Waterloo Bridge, 8.45 P. M. To General Pope: Trains and troops still passing over the same route. A deserter just come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as far as Barber's covered with smoke and lines of dust. The deserter reports the arrival last evening of the greater portion of Longstreet's corps at its present position. (Signed) John S. Clark, Colonel and A
rriving in the cars, I thought if it could be done time would be gained by his being landed here rather than at Warrenton Junction. (Signed) Irwin McDowell, Major-General Commanding. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. United States military telegraph. Received August 26, 1862. From near Waterloo Bridge, 8.45 P. M. To General Pope: Trains and troops still passing over the same route. A deserter just come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entire district from Jefferson to Culpeper, Sperryville, and as far as Barber's covered with smoke and lines of dust. The deserter reports the arrival last evening of the greater portion of Longstreet's corps at its present position. (Signed) John S. Clark, Colonel and A
y all day. I watched it all from the corner, and estimated their force, comparing my estimate with that of others, at seventy thousand men. Their supply-wagons were few in number and mostly empty. The men carried no knapsacks, merely a blanket, and many of them my hospital blankets, stolen from the beds, and ordinary accoutrements of cup, canteen, etc. During their passage I saw Lee riding in an ambulance, he having been recently injured by a fall from his horse; Longstreet, Anderson, Kemper, Evans, (of Ball's Bluff fame,) Cobb, (drunk,) Hill, and a number of others, whose names I've forgotten. Their army was divided into three corps--Jackson, Longstreet, and A. P. Hill--(General D. H. Hill commands a division.) During all day Thursday Stuart's cavalry held the town, Stuart and Lee dining in town. While the troops were passing, three small rebel flags were seen, and in one the Union or blue part was down, denoting distress. We enjoyed the mistake, and have since taken the h