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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 55 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 47 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James L. Kemper or search for James L. Kemper in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
roism in American history. The Old First Virginia formed part of Kemper's brigade. It held the centre position in the brigade line. The 3partly sheltered in the woods. The distance from the position of Kemper's brigade to the angle of the tone wall, the point of attack, was jme the line of battle, Richard B. Garnett's brigade on the left and Kemper's brigade on the right, while Armistead's came close in the rear. crying: General, let us go at them again! Just about then General James L. Kemper was carried into the crowd, and the latter came to a halt.These words will never be forgotten. Just then, he turned to General Kemper and remarked: General Kemper, I hope you are not seriously hurtGeneral Kemper, I hope you are not seriously hurt, can I do anything for you? General Kemper looked up and replied: General Lee, you can do nothing for me; I am mortally wounded, but see to General Kemper looked up and replied: General Lee, you can do nothing for me; I am mortally wounded, but see to it that full justice is done my men who made this charge. General Lee said: I will, and rode off. General Pickett turned to us, saying: Yo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Gettysburg, [from the times-dispatch, April 10, 1904.] (search)
his regiment on the right wing of Pickett's charge, under Kemper, and struck the Federal line to the right of where General Armistead made the break. The soldiers of Kemper there took the Federal entrenchments, and remained about twenty minutes ithree little Virginia brigades were drawn up in two lines, Kemper on the right (1st, 3d, 7th, 11th and 24), Garnett on the ld and 57th) Virginia Regiments, covering the space between Kemper's left and Garnett's right flanks. This position was assit. At the critical moment, in respone to a request from Kemper, Armistead, bracing himself to the desperate blow, rushed forward to Kemper's and Garnett's line, delivered his fire, and with one supreme effort planted his colors on the famous rocance commenced General Pickett rode up and down in rear of Kemper and Garnett, and in this position he continued as long as hat it was nearly a year before he was fit for duty. When Kemper was riding off, after asking Armistead to move up to his s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain John Holmes Smith's account. (search)
Lynchburg, Va., Feb. 4th and 5th. John Holmes Smith, formerly Captain of Company G (the Home Guard), of Lynchburg, Va., and part of the 11th Virginia Infantry, Kemper's Brigade, Pickett's Division, 1st Corps (Longstreet), C. S. A., commanded that company, and then the regiment for a time in the battle of Gettysburg. He says a the long shadows cast by the figures of the men, their legs appearing to lengthen immediately as the shadows fell. The 11th Virginia was the right regiment of Kemper's Brigade and of Pickett's Division. No notable event occurred in the morning, nor was there any firing of note near us that specially attracted my attention. ed men in the party with me, or maybe less. Adjutant H. V. Harris, of the regimental staff, was there dismounted. Captain Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General of General Kemper, was also there on foot, with a courier, who was a long-legged, big-footed fellow, whom we called Big Foot Walker, also afoot. Captain R. W. Douthat, of Comp