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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. Miles Kendrick or search for J. Miles Kendrick in all documents.

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nt of Gen. Pope's body-guard, commanded by Capt. Kendrick, who very kindly detached ten men for me, rd, threw off the first pile of fire, when Capt. Kendrick arrived, and immediately went to work withwhich arrived in five or ten minutes, with Capt. Kendrick in command. We pushed on at full gallop, ting through the floor. At the same time Captain Kendrick discovered a considerable number of the en next me on the right, and between me and Capt. Kendrick, was severely wounded, and the two horses ber, placed us out of range. I requested Captain Kendrick with most of his men to go back and bringnd, half a mile to the rear, where I found Capt. Kendrick, who could obtain no support to bring to u the bridge I had been watching, and with Captain Kendrick, one or two more officers and ten men of urners a way was kept open for them. To Capt. Kendrick I return sincere thanks for his kindness. ooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled tw
achment of Gen. Pope's body-guard, commanded by Capt. Kendrick, who very kindly detached ten men for me, and ay-guard, threw off the first pile of fire, when Capt. Kendrick arrived, and immediately went to work with his nce, which arrived in five or ten minutes, with Capt. Kendrick in command. We pushed on at full gallop, scatt bursting through the floor. At the same time Captain Kendrick discovered a considerable number of the enemy he man next me on the right, and between me and Capt. Kendrick, was severely wounded, and the two horses immedy timber, placed us out of range. I requested Captain Kendrick with most of his men to go back and bring up a ground, half a mile to the rear, where I found Capt. Kendrick, who could obtain no support to bring to us. I burn the bridge I had been watching, and with Captain Kendrick, one or two more officers and ten men of the bdge-burners a way was kept open for them. To Capt. Kendrick I return sincere thanks for his kindness. He h
names I do not remember, who composed my staff on the day of the battles, who are entitled to great credit for the services which they rendered me, and for the prompt manner in which they discharged their duty, regardless of personal danger. I am particularly under obligations to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in relation to the posting and arranging of the artillery. I am under great obligations to the gallant Lieutenant Wickliffe Cooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twelve thou
f the Tennessee battalion, under Lieut.-Col. Childs, presents a refreshing contrast to the foregoing. They met the enemy bravely, checked his advance, rescued Col. Metcalfe, abandoned by his own regiment, and though too few to retrieve the action, at least saved the honor of our arms. Lieut.-Colonel Childs will accept the thanks of the Major-General, and convey to his officers and soldiers his high appreciation of their gallantry and good conduct. By order of Major-General Nelson. J. Miles Kendrick, A. A.G. and Chief of Staff. Official: J. E. Stacey, A. A.G. Colonel Metcalfe's letter. Richmond, Ky., August 24, 1862. I have had stirring times since I left Lexington. Yesterday, about one o'clock, my pickets were driven in from the top of Big Hill, about fifteen miles from Richmond, to my camp near the foot of the hill. I immediately called out all the men I could call together, numbering four hundred. and started for the summit. When near our destination we dismount