hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 55 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 19 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 7 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John R. Kenly or search for John R. Kenly in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 4 document sections:

e had descended on the guard at Front Royal, Col. Kenly, First Maryland regiment, commanding, burninrtillery, were immediately sent to reinforce Col. Kenly. Later in the evening, despatches from fugio had escaped to Winchester informed us that Col. Kenly's force had been destroyed, with but few exc— infantry, artillery, and cavalry — sent to Col. Kenly were recalled; the advance-guard, Col. Donneright flank. The capture and destruction of Col. Kenly's command, first brigade, on the twenty-thirh orders to prepare to march immediately. Col. Kenly, the lamented officer of the Maryland First, from Strasburgh and reported immediately to Col. Kenly, who ordered him at once to charge the enemyore coolness, judgment, and bravery than did Col. Kenly. His cry to his men was not go, but come wiurbed by uncertain rumors of the disaster of Col. Kenly, I retired to rest in the town of Winchester how could he hesitate? So on Friday noon Col. Kenly's regiment was suddenly attacked at Front Ro[2 more...]<
sir: In pursuance of orders from the War Department, Col. John R. Kenly, commanding First Maryland volunteers, was sent on txpectations were entertained from the slender command of Col. Kenly. It was a guerrilla force, and not an organized and wela contest with the enemy, against overwhelming numbers. Col. Kenly was not the man to avoid a contest, at whatever odds. ieut.-Col. Dushane, and five companies on the left under Col. Kenly. The battery, Lieut. Atwell commanding, opened fire upowhich ended in the complete destruction of the command. Col. Kenly, at the head of his column, was wounded in this action. furlough. All the regimental officers were captured. Col. Kenly, who was represented to have been killed, is now understen gone but a short time when they came dashing back to Colonel Kenly, the long roll was beat, and we were immediately drawn ly cutting us to pieces, our men fighting desperately. Colonel Kenly, seeing our position, called our men to rally around th
violence and serious breaches of the peace. The news of the defeat of the First Maryland regiment and of the death of Col. Kenly caused a high feeling of exasperation, and this was increased by the open rejoicing of the disloyal among us over theseoicing of the secessionists at the defeat of the First Maryland regiment and the reported death of its brave Colonel, John R. Kenly. On Saturday evening groups of secessionists were observed at the corners of streets and other public places, where The Union man, after stating that he did not know nor desire to know him, inquired who he alluded to. The reply was, John R. Kenly. Soon as he had spoken the words he was knocked down on the sidewalk. This was soon made known to the Union men in the city, were attacked by the Union men and whipped, on account of their exultation and rejoicing over the defeat of Colonel Kenly's regiment. A difficulty occurred in front of the residence of Mr. Passano, High street, near Lombard, between a sec
violence and serious breaches of the peace. The news of the defeat of the First Maryland regiment and of the death of Col. Kenly caused a high feeling of exasperation, and this was increased by the open rejoicing of the disloyal among us over theseoicing of the secessionists at the defeat of the First Maryland regiment and the reported death of its brave Colonel, John R. Kenly. On Saturday evening groups of secessionists were observed at the corners of streets and other public places, where The Union man, after stating that he did not know nor desire to know him, inquired who he alluded to. The reply was, John R. Kenly. Soon as he had spoken the words he was knocked down on the sidewalk. This was soon made known to the Union men in the city, were attacked by the Union men and whipped, on account of their exultation and rejoicing over the defeat of Colonel Kenly's regiment. A difficulty occurred in front of the residence of Mr. Passano, High street, near Lombard, between a sec