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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 42 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 40 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 13 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John Kenyon or search for John Kenyon in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 8 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
Chapter 1: Vienna. Prince Metternich. Journal. Vienna, June 20, 1836.—This forenoon I did nothing but drive about the city and make a few visits; one to Kenyon, the brother of my old friend in London, who has lived here many years, and who seems to have the same spirit of kindness which I found so pleasant and useful in England; another to Baron Lerchenfeld, the Bavarian Minister, a very courteous person; one to Dr. Jarcke, one of the persons most confidentially employed by Metternich; and several others whom I did not find at home, among them the British Minister, Sir Frederick Lamb, who, I am sorry to learn, is absent, and not likely to return while I am here. In doing this I drove a good deal about the city, and was surprised to find how clean it is, how rich, solid, substantial, and even fresh, everything looks. Pavement can hardly be better than it is made in the streets here, the whole being of hewn, square blocks of granite, almost as nicely fitted to e
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
ns at Paris, I was well pleased to set my feet once more on British earth. . . . . A letter from Kenyon inviting us to dine with him next Saturday, and one we received, just as we were packing up in Pd Professor Smyth, which were all as pleasant as morning visits well could be. We dined again at Kenyon's, who wanted us to meet a Dr. Raymond, one of the high dignitaries of the Church, attached to tof the Prometheus Vinctus of Aeschylus. Mrs. Browning. The dinner was very agreeable; indeed, Kenyon always makes his house so, from his own qualities. . . . . March 27.—A very busy day. As soonby visits from H. C. Robinson and two or three other persons. These were not fairly over before Kenyon came to take us to the club houses, the Athenaeum, the University, the Travellers', and the Unitconversation, and altogether we were enticed to stay late. April 1.—A delightful breakfast at Kenyon's. Southey and his son were there; Chorley, the biographer of Mrs. Hemans, and much given to mus
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
was nowhere obscure, nor were his sentences artificially constructed, though some of them, no doubt, savored of his peculiar manner. June 2.—. . . . I dined at Kenyon's, with a literary party: Reed, the author of Italy; Dyce, the editor of Old Plays, whom I was very glad to see; H. N. Coleridge; and especially Talfourd, the aut time; in short, he was exceedingly kind. But it is out of the question. To-morrow is our last day in London. . . . . June 5.—. . . . We went to breakfast at Kenyon's, where we met Davies Gilbert,—the former President of the Royal Society,—Guillemard, young Southey, and Mr. Andrew Crosse, of Somersetshire, who has made so muowing; a fine, manly, frank fellow, of about fifty years old, full of genius and zeal. It was an interesting morning, but it was ended by a very sad parting; for Kenyon is an old and true friend, and when he stood by the carriage door as we stepped in, we could none of us get out the words we wanted to utter. Leaving London
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
Arrival at home. letters to Miss Edgeworth, Mr. Legare, Prince John of Saxony, Count Circourt, Mr. Prescott, Mr. Kenyon, and others. death of Mr. Legare. Mr. Ticknor's second return from Europe resembled the first in the happiness it bno mind to give it up. This is the last letter that remains of a truly delightful correspondence; and in the one to Mr. Kenyon, which stands next in these pages, Mr. Ticknor describes the sudden shock, and the striking scenes, with which the warmd to part from the hopes for their country that Mr. Ticknor had rested on his friend's talents and principles. To Mr. John Kenyon, London. Boston, June 29, 1843. dear Kenyon,—By each of the last steamers I received a letter from you, the firsKenyon,—By each of the last steamers I received a letter from you, the first a long one, both most refreshing and delightful, and full of your kind and faithful nature. I wish I could answer them both as they ought to be answered, cheerfully, brightly, heartily. But I cannot. I am full of troubled thoughts, even I may sa
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
Chapter 11: Letters to Mr. Lyell, Miss Edgeworth, Mr. Kenyon, G. T. Curtis, C. S. Daveis, Prince John of Saxony, G. S. Hillard, and Horatio Greenough. summers at Geneseo, N. Y.; Manchester, on Massachusetts Bay. journeys in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, etc. passing Public events. slavery and repudiation. prison discipline. Revolutions of 1848. Astor place riots. To Charles Lyell, Esq., London. Boston, November 30, 1843. my dear Mr. Lyell,—I wrote you to do, and your aunt thrives so well, and we all have so good a time, and the country is so beautiful, and the travelling so easy, etc., etc., that there is no telling what will be the end of the matter, or when we shall get to Niagara. To John Kenyon, Eeq., London. March 30, 1845. . . . . With the February packet came a codicil to your kindness, again most delightful, for which we owe you more thanks. How can we render them? Come and see. Here are the Lyells coming a second time, not
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
lping her sister, who uses the Florence edition, as she is not yet so familiar with the grand old Tuscan as to read him without notes that are very ample. To John Kenyon, London. Boston, January 8, 1855. dear Kenyon,—I do not choose to have another year get fairly on its course, without carrying to you assurances of our contKenyon,—I do not choose to have another year get fairly on its course, without carrying to you assurances of our continued good wishes and affection. The last we heard from you was through Mrs. Ticknor's correspondent, ever-faithful Lady Lyell, who said she had seen you in the Zoological Gardens, well, comfortable, and full of that happiness that goodness bosoms ever. But this second-hand news is not enough. We are growing old apace. My girle an end of it than if we were Englishmen. At least, such is the case with those of us who are most interested in the land of our forefathers. . . . . My dear Kenyon, remember us, as we do you, with true regard, and write to us as soon as you can. Yours faithfully always, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
d Lady Clarendon, Lord Harrowby, Lord John Russell, Frederick Peel; and a most charming, cheerful, free time we made of it till near midnight. I talked a good deal with Lord Clarendon and Lord Harrowby, as well as with Cardwell and Sir George, about America,—three of them being of the Ministry,—and found, as I have uniformly found, a great desire to keep at peace with us. . . . . Thackeray has been to see us a good deal, but he is very poorly, and has troubles that may wear him out . . . . . Kenyon, too, is very ill with asthma, at the Isle of Wight, where he has taken a beautiful place, and on finding himself a little better asked us to come and see him for as long as we could stay. But it is not possible, or we should certainly go. Colonel Harcourt asked us, also, to the Isle of Wight, and at one moment I thought we might combine the two; but I must not be too late on the Continent, or my plans will be all spoiled. Stirling invites us to Keir, when we come back, and I shall try to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
0. Keiblinger, librarian of Molk, II. 23. Kemble, Stephen, I. 291, 292. Kempt, Sir, James, II. 176. Kenney, Mr., I. 406. Kent, Duchess of, I. 435, 437. Kent, James, Chancellor, I. 338-340, II. 200, 226. Kenyon, Edward, II. 1. Kenyon, John, I. 411 and note, 418, II. 145, 149, 181, 182, 183, 323; letters 212, 223, 291. Kenyon, Mrs., John, I. 456. Kestner, A., II. 58, 59, 64, 65, 72, 84. Kestner, Charlotte Buff, I. 78. Kildare, Marquis of, II. 168. King, Rufus, I. 350, Kenyon, Mrs., John, I. 456. Kestner, A., II. 58, 59, 64, 65, 72, 84. Kestner, Charlotte Buff, I. 78. Kildare, Marquis of, II. 168. King, Rufus, I. 350, 351. Kinglake, J. A., II. 378, 382. Kingsley, Professor, I. 14. Kirkland, Dr., President of Harvard College, I. 332, 355, 360, 368; letter to, 321-3 Klopstock, F. G., I. 125. Kmety General, II. 373. Knapp, Professor, 1.112, 113. Koenneritz, von, II. 115. Kossuth, Louis, II. 276. Krause of Weisstropp, I. 476, II. 10. Kremsmunster Monastery, II 27-30. Kurta of St. Florian, H. 25, 26, 27. L Ladouchefe, Henry (Lord Taunton) I. 408, 411, II. 822, 871, 372, 886, 482.