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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Bellenden Ker or search for Bellenden Ker in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
and antiquities, and was Deputy Keeper of her Majesty's Public Records. Serjeant Talfourd, and Lockhart; next with the Lord Mayor at Guildhall; next passed the day at Windsor Castle, the guest of the household, breakfasting and lunching with Lord Byron, Earl of Surrey, Hon. Colonel Cavendish, Murray, and Rich; next dined with Joseph Parkes, the great Radical and a most intelligent man, who thoroughly knows Lord Brougham; next with Mr. Senior, where were Count Pologne, Count Ravel, and Mr. Bellenden Ker; next with Mr. Serjeant D'Oyly, where were Mr. Justice Littledale, Mr. Serjeant Taddy, and Mr. Impey; and to-night, if my cold will let me go out, with Bingham, Peregrine Bingham, author of Treatise on the Law of Infancy and Coverture. He invited Sumner to dine in Dec., 1838, at 34 Mecklenburgh Square; and on another occasion when Charles Austin was to be his guest. the reporter,—a most able man, and friend of Jeremy Bentham,—to meet Austin and some of the philosophical Radicals; t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
gers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
gers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined