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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. (search)
e of the Wilderness. When General Grant began his advance from Culpeper, two divisions of General Longstreet's corps, Kershaw's and Field's, were in the neighborhood of Gordonsville, having recently arrived from east Tennessee. The march began os corps had been engaged that evening. About midnight the men were aroused by marching orders, and the corps moved off, Kershaw's division in front. It was probably 2 o'clock A. M. when my brigade left camp. The progress made before light was son rose into enthusiasm when a retreating soldier shouted, Courage, boys, Longstreet's men are driving them like sheep. Kershaw then had reached the field, and gone into action, and they knew well what to expect of him. He had arrived, like De Saixin time to save us from a great mortification; but it was in time to retrieve the disaster. It was Wofford's brigade of Kershaw's division. It swooped down upon the enemy in the midst of their exultation and confusion, and swept them away like cha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
hing on as directed, by head of column, deployed at once. Kershaw, a very cool, judicious and gallant gentleman, immediatelyus Mississippian, following, came into line on the left of Kershaw, his men sheltered by trees and part of a stone wall and uce or form line to the left and march down upon them. General Kershaw in his report says, his brigade being at the head of md him that his (General Longstreet's) desire was, that he (Kershaw) should attack the enemy at the peach orchard, turn his flht really did, as it would simply have been absurd for General Kershaw to have attempted to do as he was required or desired.ssistance, and the charge of my division was ordered. General Kershaw, with his South Carolina brigade, leading, followed byuick the whole line as it advanced became heavily engaged, Kershaw and Semmes acting together on the right. These brigades garly morning of the 3d my new line was carefully revised. Kershaw and Semmes' brigades towards the Round Top, and the others
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of Second South Carolina regiment in campaigns of 1864 and 1865. (search)
g; heard the minnie balls whistling and falling amongst us; saw our troops running rapidly to the rear, and learned that the enemy had surprised and routed them. Kershaw's division formed line in the midst of this confusion, like cool and well trained veterans, as they were, checked the enemy and soon drove them back. The Second ack and began to fortify. Soon our line was established and the usual skirmishing and sharpshooting commenced. That same afternoon, being on the extreme left of Kershaw's division, I received orders to hasten with the Second regiment to General Kershaw's headquarters. I found the General in a good deal of excitement. He informeGeneral Kershaw's headquarters. I found the General in a good deal of excitement. He informed me that our line had been broken on the right of his division, directed me to hasten there and if I found a regiment of the enemy flanking his position to charge them. I hurried to the point indicated, found that our troops, to the extent of a brigade and a half, had been driven from their works and the enemy in possession of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
ve, where we rest an hour at dawn on the 8th, Kershaw leading. We find Fitz. Lee hotly engaged on s occupied by us, the enemy being driven out. Kershaw's and Humphreys' brigades are turned off rapi of the church near Spotsylvania Courthouse. Kershaw is to push forward his skirmishers, but the ney are got into position — Field on the line, Kershaw in reserve. No enemy in our immediate front.ve some information of the enemy's position. Kershaw is sent to occupy his trenches during his absence. Kershaw returns on the morning of the 20th. May 20th Quiet. Ewell's front reported to ove at the same hour. Order of march: Field, Kershaw and Pickett. We go into bivouac between Hunds put on Early's left. Field on his left and Kershaw on the left of the corps. May 31st KersKershaw is taken out of line, and about 3 P. M. is sent to relieve the right of Early, the whole of whorelieved by us, he taking our entrenchments. Kershaw moves down towards Gaines' mill in the endeav[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
fty-third Georgia, on Wofford's left, ditto. Kershaw brings up the Second and Third South Carolinantime the enemy is heavily massed in front of Kershaw's salient. Anderson's, Law's and Gregg's brithe whole line. We arrive at Petersburg, and Kershaw relieves Bushrod Johnson's division — Field taking position on Kershaw's right. A feeble attack is made in the afternoon on Elliott's brigade oune 25 Usual skirmishing. At night two of Kershaw's brigades — Humphreys' and Kershaw's — are r we move with four brigades-Conner's, Lane's, Kershaw's and Wofford's — to dislodge the enemy from Troops arrive at Front Royal in afternoon. Kershaw posts a regiment on picket at the ford on the Lee's cavalry is thrown out to the front and Kershaw camped in woods to the right of the Berryvilline of the Fifteenth South Carolina regiment, Kershaw's brigade, breaks, and about a hundred men ofange. September 15 Move at sunrise with Kershaw and Cuttshaw up the Valley pike and camp on N[26 more.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
Wofford's and Perry's brigades of Anderson's division on his right, in the order named. Sykes' regulars were first met. They attacked Semmes, but were repulsed. Kershaw's brigade went to Semmes' support, but was not engaged. Wilcox, with his brigade, was ordered to the right, on Mine (or River) road, the cavalry having reported , with his three brigades and one of Anderson's, was ordered to reinforce Wilcox, that Sedgwick might be kept off Lee's rear. Wilcox was found in line at Salem. Kershaw and Wofford were placed on his right; Semmes and Mahone on his left. The enemy then advanced in three lines, principally upon Wilcox. After a fierce struggle, tent hills, but he could not hear McLaws' guns. McLaws says in his report that he agreed to advance, provided Early would attack first, and did advance his right (Kershaw and Wofford to co-operate with him); but finding his force insufficient for a front attack, he withdrew to his lines of the previous evening. In the meantime, Ea