Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kershaw or search for Kershaw in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
roops.   Left wing:  Buckner's corps.Preston4,078 Stewart3,750 Hindman's division6,100 Hood's corps.Johnson  Law  Kershaw       Total Longstreet's Report, page 375, vol. X, Rebellion Record.22,849  Cavalry (Wheeler's)4,000      Aggree rear. Preston's division was placed in reserve on the left; Law's division in the rear of Johnston's. The brigades of Kershaw and Humphries, of McLaw's division, commanded by Kershaw, were posted in rear of Law. Johnston's, Laws's and Kershaw'Kershaw, were posted in rear of Law. Johnston's, Laws's and Kershaw's commands were under Hood, and formed a column of eight brigades, arranged four lines deep. This General Longstreet intended as his principal column of attack. General Longstreet having understood a gap existed between the wings of the army, haKershaw's commands were under Hood, and formed a column of eight brigades, arranged four lines deep. This General Longstreet intended as his principal column of attack. General Longstreet having understood a gap existed between the wings of the army, had at the beginning of his formation moved Stewart's division some five hundred or six hundred yards to the right. This movement placed Stewart's division directly in front of Cheatham's line and in advance of his skirmishers. The Command
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
ucted, and rapid, that the principal body of the Confederate cavalry under General Stuart was cut off, and with difficulty made its escape by a circuitous by-way, while the remainder was driven in upon the Confederate column just as its rear was filing into the streets of Williamsburg. Fort Magruder, and the adjoining Confederate entrenchments were for awhile entirely within the enemy's power; but some delay was made to reconnoitre the position and to open a battery, and this delay enabled Kershaw's and Semmes's brigades, of McLaws's division and Macon's battery, to regain the works by a long double-quick through the mud. A little long-range firing then ensued in reply to the Yankee artillery and carbines, until the arrival of General Stuart with the rest of the Confederate cavalry. On this General Hampton with his brigade made a charge upon the enemy's position, using the sabre, and capturing one of his guns and some caissons, and drove him back upon Smith's division of infantry, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. (search)
nt Jackson, next day, I halted, and drove back a force of cavalry, which was pursuing, and then moved to Rude's Hill, where I halted, until the enemy's infantry came up next day, and was trying to flank me, when I moved off in line of battle for eight miles, occasionally halting to check the enemy. This continued until nearly sundown, when I got a position, at which I checked the enemy's further progress for that day, and then moved under cover of night towards Port Republic, to unite with Kershaw. After doing this I drove a division of cavalry from my front at Port Republic, and then moved to Waynesboroa, where two divisions under Torbert were destroying the bridge, and drove them away; and after remaining there one day I moved to the vicinity of Mount Crawford, where I awaited the arrival of Rosser's brigade to take the offensive, but before it arrived the enemy was discovered to be falling back. On the morning of the 6th I immediately commenced following the enemy, and arrived h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
uns to Major-General Pickett. He rejoined the battalion after we recrossed the Potomac. Lieutenant Dunn, of this battery, with one gun, remained with the battalion. On the 7th of July First Lieutenant R. M. Anderson, of McCarthy's battery, was ordered to take command of Captain Fraser's battery; owing to the wounds received by Captain Fraser and Lieutenant Cooper, this battery had been left with only one officer. On the morning of the 10th the battery was ordered to report to Brigadier-General Kershaw, on the Sharpsburg turnpike. It was placed in position on the right of the road. About 2 o'clock the battery took position on a hill to the left of the bridge over the Antietam, and in close range of the enemy's sharpshooters, who immediately opened a vigorous fire, killing one man and slightly wounding another. Lieutenant Anderson opened fire into a brick building on the opposite side of the creek, under cover of which the enemy's sharpshooters were collecting, and seriously an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of troops at battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ntry Confederate forces Sept. 20th--General Bragg Commanding. Right wing--Lieutenant-General Polk. Hill's corps.Breckinridge3,769 Cleburne4,670 Walker's corps.Liddell,4,355 Gist, Cheatham's division6,000    Total18,814 Cavalry, (Forrest's)3,500    Aggregate22,314 Of the infantry of this wing 4,749 were fresh troops.  Left wing--Lieutenant-General Longstreet. Buckner's corps.Preston4,078 Stewart3,750 Hindman's division6,100 Hood's corps.Johnson  Law  Kershaw     Total22,840 Cavalry (Wheeler's)4,000    Aggregate26,849    Of the infantry of this wing 10,900 were fresh troops.  Total Confederate force49,162 The Confederate line had 150 pieces of artillery.  Federal force September 20th--General Rosecranz Commanding. McCook's corps (Twentieth)10,640 Thomas's corps (Fourteenth)14,524 Crittenden's corps (Twenty-First)13,539 Granger's Reserve (Steadman's division)5,171 Cavalry (Mitchel's corps)9,676   Formi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
viz: Major-Generals Pickett, Hood and Trimble (the two latter severely wounded), Brigadier-Generals Armistead, severely wounded, Kemper, very severely wounded, Semmes, severely wounded and since dead of his wounds, Pettigrew (slightly wounded), Kershaw, Law, and G. T. Anderson, the last severely wounded. Brigadier-General Wm. Barksdale was mortally wounded in the attack on the evening of the 2d, while bravely leading his brigade in the assault. Brigadier-General P. B. Garnett was killed whilof Northern Virginia, in the engagements of the 2d and 3d of July, 1863, near Gettysburg, Pa. command.Killed.Wo'ded.Missing.Total.remarks. Officers and E. M.Officers and E. M.Officers and E. M.Officers and E. M. McLaws's Division.      Kershaw's Brigade,11548332630  Semmes's Brigade,5528491430  Barksdale's Brigade,10555092747  Wofford's Brigade,30192112334  Total,30515093272141 Pickett's Division.    Only those are reported killed and wounded who are known to be so. Many of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
in position as follows: Anderson held the crest of hills from Banks's Ford to Hazel Run, with his brigades in the following order, from left to right, viz: Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry and Featherston. McLaws stood upon his right with Cobb, Kershaw, Barksdale and Semmes. Pickett formed on McLaws's right with Jenkins, Corse, Kemper, Armistead and Garnett. Hood held the extreme right, and extended his line to Hamilton's crossing, over five miles distant from the left flank; his brigades behollow. Here they were reinforced by the 15th South Carolina, under Colonel DeSaussure, and the 16th Georgia, under Colonel Bryan, and remained until the enemy had completed his bridges, and commenced to cross his infantry, when by order of General Kershaw, Colonel DeSaussure withdrew the whole force to the Bowling Green road, except Captain Cassell's company, of the 18th Mississippi, which was hidden in the ravine of Deep Run, until the advance of the enemy's skirmishers, about sun-down, when
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the First battle of Manassas. (search)
rn slope of the ridge, while on receiving his fire, the enemy's sharp shooters would run to the crest of the ridge and empty their long range guns in reply. No injury was done to Captain Kemper or his command, of which I am aware, during the half hour, or less, that I remained with it — the enemy's shot occasionally fell about us with sufficient force to wound or kill. Leaving Captain Kemper, I rode to a squad of officers some one hundred and fifty yards to his right, composed of Preston, Kershaw, and others, also overlooking the retreating foe, without the power to prevent it. It moved me deeply, almost to tears. Although now getting late, I concluded to ride down the turnpike, and went as far as Cub Run bridge. Here I found the bridge not passable, from an immense jam of the enemy's wagons and other vehicles, and the stream not fordable. Returning to my position in the fight to see if my orders had been executed, I found everything done to my satisfaction, except that Captain B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
truggle. On the death of General Cobb, General Kershaw was ordered with two regiments to reinfor General McLaws now relieved the remainder of Kershaw's brigade from their position in front of Lees Hill, and dispatched three regiments to General Kershaw, and posted the fourth, the Third South Cers by the dense ranks behind the wall General Kershaw managed the fire of these crowded ranks ies sought shelter. Lieutenant Doby, of General Kershaw's staff, directed this firing, which was ries, the Sergeant begged permission from General Kershaw to show a white handkerchief and go out o least relieve the thirst of a few. This, General Kershaw was compelled to refuse, lest it should bg shot, that, honoring his noble motives, General Kershaw at length consented, though fully expectih, the enemy's pickets not being visible, General Kershaw sent out scouts, who soon reported that td relieved Cooke's during the night, one from Kershaw's and one from Semmes's brigade. These regim[1 more...]