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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 233 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 182 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 95 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 69 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 64 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 47 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 38 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Kershaw or search for J. B. Kershaw in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
In fact a return made on the 8th showed 261 less for duty, and 408 less in the aggregate present on that day than on the 10th. I may assume-therefore, that there was a loss of five and a half per cent. in my division from the 20th of June to the beginning of the battle, and that there was the same ratio of decrease in the rest of our infantry-during the same period. To show the likelihood of there being at least as much loss in Longstreet's and Hill's corps as in Ewell's, I quote from General Kershaw's report the following statement: Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sunstroke occurred. General Hill started from the heights of Fredericksburg on the 15th, I believe, and his march had to be rapid to join Longstreet's corps, and hence the probability is that the loss in his corps exceeded the ratio in my division. Take as the full strength of the infantry,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
dvanced to recover the lost ground. This might make the impression that General Longstreet became engaged almost instantly upon reaching the field. As the head (Kershaw's division) of Longstreet's column arrived, I met it and ordered it to file to the right as rapidly as possible into the woods, so as to form line of battle speedily, less my division, then being forced back, might be driven on to it before it should form. Less than a brigade of Kershaw had filed into the woods when Longstreet appeared on the field. I pointed out to him where General Lee could be found; he was within two hundred yards of us. My division was not forced back upon Kershaw; tKershaw; the enemy halted some three hundred yards short, and it was not until after 9 A. M., according to Swinton, page 431, that Hancock renewed the advance. He says over two hours were in this manner lost, leaving Longstreet ample time to form line of battle. Page 130. Spotsylvania Courthouse.--Upon an examination of the lines, Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
al to report with the original portion of the First corps (Kershaw's and Field's divisions and Alexander's battalion of artilngles with it and about three miles below Parker's store. Kershaw's division was in the lead, arriving in rear of the line hto the right, and had only time to deploy two regiments of Kershaw's old brigade, an advance was made by the whole line of thening their ranks to let the retreating divisions through, Kershaw formed his line on the right and Field on the left of the eutenant-Colonel W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Operations of Kershaw's division. On the 4th of May, 1864, in camp near Ging-General, I directed Colonel J. W. Hennegan, commanding Kershaw's brigade, to file to the right and form line of battle winot the particulars of casualties at hand, except those in Kershaw's brigade, which were 57 killed, 239 wounded and 26 missiness and gallantry worthy of all possible commendation. J. B. Kershaw, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division. Report o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
, patriotism and virtue could have been so long hidden from the appreciation of the world. He eloquently and earnestly insisted that although the battle had been finally lost, it is our privilege and our duty to perpetuate. the fame of our great army. He said that in selecting orators for these reunions the Executive Committee had endeavored not only to choose a suitable speaker, but also to have different States represented. Acting on this principle, they had elected this year General J. B. Kershaw, of the noble Palmetto State. As late as August he had written that unforeseen engagements would compel him to withdraw his consent to speak. But the committee naturally turned to the old Second corps--the right arm of the Army of Northern Virginia --and ordered into their service a distinguished member of Stonewall Jackson's staff. He was happy to say that, even on this short notice, he had responded, and took pleasure in introducing, as orator of the evening, Colonel William A