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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
e was confronted by a line of redoubts before Williamsburg. The works consisted of a large fort (Magruder) at the junction of two roads running from Yorktown to Williamsburg, and small redoubts on each side of this, making an irregular chain of fortifications extending, with the creeks upon which they rested on either flank, across the peninsula. The Confederate brigades of The 61st New York regiment in camp at ship point, below Yorktown. [see map, P. 188.] from a War-time sketch. Kershaw and Semmes, of Magruder's command, occupied the works when Stoneman came in front of them, and, on finding his advance stubbornly opposed, Stoneman sent his cavalry upon reconnoissances over the field, and waited for the infantry under Hooker and Smith to come to his support. These divisions marched from Yorktown on parallel roads until Smith's column was halted by a burning bridge, and compelled to turn into the road by which Hooker was advancing. Sumner accompanied Smith's column, and,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
the other four brigades are given in a note, dated 11 P. M., May 31st, addressed to me by their immediate commander, General McLaws. He says: General Cobb, five regiments, [posted] from the Mechanicsville road to General Harvey's place; General Kershaw from General Harvey's to Baker's; Generals Griffith and Semmes from General Kershaw's right to New Bridge, and on the line down New Bridge road. Magruder's six brigades were the only forces guarding the crossings of the Chickahominy fromGeneral Kershaw's right to New Bridge, and on the line down New Bridge road. Magruder's six brigades were the only forces guarding the crossings of the Chickahominy from New Bridge to Meadow Bridge. On the Federal side Keyes's corps, with abundant artillery, occupied that part of the Federal third line of defense which was on the south side of the Williamsburg road, one and three-eighths miles east of Seven Pines. One brigade and two regiments of Hooker's division were close in rear of Keyes, and two brigades of Kearny's division were in the trenches of the third line of defense, on the north side of the Williamsburg road; whilst Birney's brigade of that d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
Va. Battery, Capt. W. J. Dabney. Artillery loss; k, 3; w, 11==14. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Col. Alfred Cumming (w), Capt. W. C. Holt; 53d Ga., Col. L. T. Doyal; 5th La., Col. T. G. Hunt; 10th La., Lieut.-Col. Eugene Waggaman (w and c); 15th Va., Col. T. P. August (w); 32d Va., Lieut.-Col. William R. Willis; N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly. Brigade loss: k, 31; w, 121; m, 63==215. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy, Maj. F. Gaillard; 3d S. C., Colonel James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken; 8th S. C., Col. John W. Henagan; Va. Battery (Alexandria Arty.), Capt. Del Kemper. Brigade loss: k, 70; w, 349; m, 38 == 457. Magruder's division. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Howell Cobb: 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Ga. Legion (Cobb's)-; 2d La., Col. J. T. Norwood (mn w); 15th N. C., Col. Henry A. Dowd (w); Ga. Battery (Troup Ar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a victory for the Federals. Though their loss was three times as great as that of the Confederates, they accomplished the main purpose of the battle, which was to gain time for the passage of trains, artillery, and troops across White Oak Swamp. The Confederate force engaged in this fight was commanded by General J. B. Magruder, and consisted of Semmes's and Kershaw's brigades, Kemper's battery, and two regiments of Barksdale's brigade opposite our left. Cobb's division and two guns of Hart's battery were north of the railroad to the right of our line. Cobb's infantry was not engaged. About a half-hour after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry out the commanding general's orders, so far as I was concerned, and cross the White Oak Swamp with General Smith's division. We were then on the fiel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
ndition upon which the order was predicated was not fulfilled, and that I wanted instructions. He replied to advance when I heard the shouting. We did advance at the signal, and after an unassisted struggle for an hour and a half, and after meeting with some success, we were compelled to fall back under cover of the woods. Magruder advanced at the same signal, having portions of the divisions of Huger and McLaws, comprising the brigades of Mahone, Wright, Barksdale, Ransom, Cobb, Semmes, Kershaw, Armistead, and G. T. Anderson; but he met with some delay, and did not get in motion till he received a second order from General Lee, and we were then beaten. The Comte de Paris, who was on McClellan's staff, gives this account of the charge of my gallant division: Hill advanced alone against the Federal positions. . . . He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division, reenforced by Caldwells brigade, . . and finally the left of Kearny. The woods skirting the foot o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
mediately joined my efforts, and those of my staff who were with me, to General Cobb's, and cooperated with him for a considerable time in the vain effort to rally the men. General McLaws moved Wilcox's brigade of R. H. Anderson's, and later Kershaw's and Barksdale's brigades of his own division, to the support of Cobb, but not in time to take part in the engagement. The report of General McLaws shows that he accurately appreciated the effect of our success in completely shutting up his coroperly defended, would have required a much greater force than ours to have carried. I am unable to give the numbers, but McLaws, in his report of the operations of the day, states that he formed the line across the valley with the brigades of Kershaw and Barksdale, except one regiment and two guns of the latter, and the remnants of the brigades of Cobb, Semmes, Mahone, and Wilcox, which he afterward states were very small. The only force available for an attack would have been Smith's div
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
issing == 15,203. The Confederate Army. General Robert E. Lee. Longstreet's command, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Staff loss (in the campaign): w, 2. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Staff loss (in the campaign): k, 1. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy (w), Maj. Franklin Gaillard; 3d S. C., Col. James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken (w), Capt. John S. Hard; 8th S. C., Col. John W. Henagan, Lieut.-Col. A. J. Hoole.Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy (w), Maj. Franklin Gaillard; 3d S. C., Col. James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken (w), Capt. John S. Hard; 8th S. C., Col. John W. Henagan, Lieut.-Col. A. J. Hoole. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 90; w, 455; m, 6 = 551. Cobb's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Howell Cobb, Lieut.-Col. C. C. Sanders, Lieut.-Col. William MacRae: 16th Ga.,----; The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--Editors. 24th Ga., Lieut.-Col. C. C. Sanders, Maj. R. E. McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion,----; 15th N. C., Lieut.-Col. William MacRae. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 76; w, 318, m, 452 = 846. Semmes's Brigade, Brig. Gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The surrender of Harper's Ferry. (search)
of 600 men. Graphic accounts of this daring and successful exploit have been published by Major Thomas Bell of the 8th New York, Major W. M. Luff of the 12th Illinois, and Sergeant Pettengill of the 1st Rhode Island Cavalry--all of whom were participants, and I regret that the limits of this article do not permit the recital here. There were other incidents in the history of the events under consideration highly creditable to the troops constituting the garrison of Harper's Ferry. General Kershaw's report to General McLaws of the capture of Maryland Heights, on the 13th, states that he met with a most obstinate resistance from our force stationed there, a fierce fire being kept up at a distance of one hundred yards, and it was not till he had sent General Barksdale's brigade to attack the works in rear that the heights were evacuated. The fighting with Jackson's advance in front of Bolivar Heights, on the afternoon of the 14th and on the morning of the 15th, by the troops pos