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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 70 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 29 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 25 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 19 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 16 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Keyes or search for Keyes in all documents.

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ite this fearful disparity in numbers our troops still maintained their position, constantly breaking and shattering the enemy's ranks. But now came Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, six thousand strong, adding number to number, and forcing our line at last to give way, though only when ordered to do so by the hequipped men that ever took the field —according to their own history of the day—was formed of Colonels Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions, Colonels Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, and the formidable batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arnold's Regulars, and 2d Rhode Island and two Dahlgren howitzers—a force of eighteen per cent. of the brigade. A regiment of Franklin's brigade—Gorman's—lost twentyone per cent. Griffin's (battery) loss was thirty per cent., and that of Keyes's brigade, which was so handled by its commander as to be exposed to only occasional volleys from our troops, was at least ten per cent. To these facts add the
corching fire of our men; but fresh regiments of Federalists came upon the field. Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, as is stated in their reports, numbered over six thousand bayonehe incessant fire of at least twenty pieces of artillery, with the fresh brigades of Sherman and Keyes approaching, the latter already in musket range, our lines gave back, but under orders from Genel history of the day, was formed of Colonels Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions, Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, and of the formidable batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arnoldmplete. About the time that Elzey and Early were entering into action, a column of the enemy, Keyes's brigade, of Tyler's division, made its way across the turnpike between Bull Run and the Robins (Gorman's) lost twenty-one per cent. Griffin's (battery) loss was thirty per cent., and that of Keyes's brigade, which was so handled by its commander as to be exposed to only occasional volleys fro