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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 70 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 29 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 25 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 19 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 16 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Keyes or search for Keyes in all documents.

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Among the numerous private letters found on the field after the battle of the "Seven Pines," are that serve to illustrate the ignorance and beastly propensities of the writers, but we occasionally come across one exhibiting a practical view of affairs that renders its publication a matter of interest to the Northern reader. The following extracts are taken from a letter written by a young man in Pittsburgh, Pa. (May 23d.) to his taker, Capt. Alen'r Hay, of the 61st Pennsylvania regiment, Gen. Keyes's corpsd'er--Should his sentiments by any accident ever be subjected to perusal at the North, there is reason to believe that the author would be arrested on the charge of treason: * * * * From what we can learn, it looks as though the rebellion was about "played out. " At every point they have been beaten, and for some months past they have not gained anything of particular or lasting benefit, while we have steadily advanced, sweeping everything before us, taking New Orleans and Norf