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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 100 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 4 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 27 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 19 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 15 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for E. D. Keyes or search for E. D. Keyes in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
a protection to James River — as well as the moral effect of a retreat which allowed a vast hostile army to knock at the very gates of Richmond, were undesirable. McClellan, with his five corps under Sumner, Franklin, Porter, Heintzelman, and Keyes, slowly followed the Confederate army as it fell back on Richmond. As he arrived in its immediate vicinity he began to deploy his legions, taking care to extend well his right so that it might reach out for McDowell's junction. This officer, wilowly but surely McClellan was diminishing the distance between the lines of his army and the Southern capital, and his big Parrott guns were now nearly in a position to throw shot within the walls of the city. On May 23d the Fourth Corps, under Keyes, crossed the Chickahominy at Bottom's Bridge and took position at a place called Seven Pines, some five miles from the city; the Third Corps, under Heintzelman, followed. The Chickahominy now divided McClellan's army into two parts. Two of his
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
use of History. The next move on the military chessboard absorbed his immediate attention. The strongly constructed battle lines of his powerful enemy were uncomfortably close. McClellan had already commenced to strengthen his front at Seven Pines. Franklin's corps was brought from the north to the south side of the Chickahominy and posted on the right of that portion of his line. On the left was Sumner, and to his left Heintzelman extended as far as the White Oak swamp. In their rear Keyes was in reserve. On the north or left bank of the Chickahominy Fitz John Porter's corps was still stationed, near Gaines Mill, with McCall's division of Pennsylvania reserves at Mechanicsville and on Beaver Dam Creek-eleven divisions in all. Richmond, Mc-Clellan's coveted prize, was but five miles away. To reach it he had to pass over the lines of the Army of Northern Virginia. These lines were held by five divisions-A. P. Hill's on the left: at Meadow Bridge, Huger's and Magruder's next,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
promoted, 133; wounded, 149; praised, 369; to oppose Sherman, 372; letter to Mrs. Lee, 416. Johnston, Peter, mentioned, 9. Jones, General J. R., wounded, 212- 214. Jones, General W. E., mentioned, 219, 224, 241. Kautz's cavalry expedition, 364. Kearney, General, Philip, 34, 196. Kelly's Ford, 187. Kelton, General, 197. Keith, Rev., John, 26. Kemper, General, wounded at Gettysburg, 296. Kershaw's division in the Valley, 353- Kershaw, General, captured, 385. Keyes, General E. D., 140, 145. Kilpatrick's cavalry, 266, 270, 315; raid on Richmond, 323. King's division, 191, 192, 193. Kossuth, General, Louis, 423. Lacy House, 229. Lacy, Rev. Dr. B. T., 246. Lafayette, Marquis, 10. La Haye, Sainte, 420. Last cavalry engagement, 393. Latane, Captain, killed, 153. Lawton, General, 130. League of Gileadites, 75. Ledlie, General, 357, 358, 359- Lee, Algernon Sydney, 17. Lee, Anne Hill, 20. Lee, Annie, mentioned, 217, 235. Lee, Cassius F.,