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rior at an early date; but, in 1755, it became an active business. Casks for them were made in Medford; and the vote of the town required that each cask should be examined by a committee, and, if well made, then marked with a double M. Coopering now became an extensive and profitable branch of business. It was begun, before the Revolution, by the agency of Mr. Benjamin Hall. Charles Henley, of Boston, was his foreman, and superintended it till 1802. Andrew Blanchard, Joseph Pierce, and James Kidder were apprentices in Mr. Hall's establishment. Mr. Benjamin Hall was among the first and the most active of the Medford merchants. He not only carried on the distilling business, but had a large store for wholesale barter. It was not uncommon for him to receive a hundred barrels of pearl-ashes per day, and five hundred tierces of flax-seed per year. He also carried on the beef business, having seven hundred head of cattle slaughtered each year. Mr. Ebenezer Hall had an equal number
Jonathan Tufts. Ebenezer Tufts. James Tufts. Gershom Teal. Watts Turner. Hutchinson Tufts, jun. Eleazer Usher. Nathaniel Watts. Ebenezer Williams. Isaac Warren. Gardner Greenleaf. Joseph Wyman. James Wyman. John Wade. Convers Francis. John Mead and John Williams. ----Webster. Joseph Wyman. Benj. Pratt and----Brown. Isaac Greenleaf and H. Popkins. John Wright. Jonathan Godden. John Hall and Joseph Tufts. Francis Wait. James Kidder. The inhabitants occupied one hundred and thirty-six houses, which were valued at $74,032.80; making an average value of $544 each. The town valuation of all other property was $160,116.60. Taxes were assessed on 4,603 acres of land. We may close these tables of taxes by inserting the State valuation tables for seven decades, from 1790 to 1850 inclusive. Medford stands thus: In 1790, its State valuation was $9,441.68; in 1800, $15,036,08; in 1810, $26,311.19; in 1820, $30,507.84;
, of Little Horsted, and d. 1599, leaving two sons and several daughters. John (5), oldest son of the last, baptized 1561, m. Joan Beorge, and died in 1616, leaving four sons. James (6), the youngest of these, b. 1595, was the father of James (7), b., 1626, at East Grinstead, who moved to New England, and married Anna Moore, of Camb., N. E., in 1649. This foregoing pedigree is condensed from one in the History of New Ipswich, prepared by Frederick Kidder, a co-editor of that work.  7James Kidder resided first at a farm on the north side of Fresh Pond and Menotomy River, whence he removed to Shawshine, now Billerica. He had twelve children, of whom Samuel (8) was the youngest, who left children. He was b. Jan. 7, 1666; m. Sarah Griggs, Dec. 23, 1689, and lived near Porter's Hotel, in Camb., where the names of Kidder's Swamp and Kidder's Lane still preserve his memory. He was deacon of the church; and the inventory of his estate was £ 1,138. He had six children; the oldest was--
on streets. He m. Joanna, wid. of John Champney, and had Hannah, b. 15 Sept. 1643, m. John Hastings 1 Mar. 1665-6; Lydia; Ruth. The last two are named by Mitchell. Mr. Moore rem. to Billerica, and d. there 3 Sept. 1698, a. about 89; his w. Joanna d. 18 Feb. 1675-6. 4. Francis, had a grant of land in 1638, and in 1642 had a dwelling-house near the spot now occupied by the church on the N. W. corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets. His chil. were Francis; Samuel; Thomas; Anna, m. James Kidder about 1650; Sarah, b. 3 Ap. 1643; John, b. 20 Mar. 1644-5. His w. Katherine d. 28 Dec. 1648, and he m. wid. Elizabeth Periman 6 Dec. 1653. Mr. Moore d. 20 Aug. 1671, a. 85; his w. Elizabeth d. 5 Nov. 1683, a. 84. 5.. Francis, s. of Francis (4), m. Albee (or Alba) Eaton 7 Sept. 1650. He res. near the junction of Spruce and Cedar streets, was Selectman thirteen years, from 1673 to 1687, and d. 23 Feb. 1688-9, a. 69; his w. Alba d. 19 Ap. 1708. They appear to have had no children. Th
on streets. He m. Joanna, wid. of John Champney, and had Hannah, b. 15 Sept. 1643, m. John Hastings 1 Mar. 1665-6; Lydia; Ruth. The last two are named by Mitchell. Mr. Moore rem. to Billerica, and d. there 3 Sept. 1698, a. about 89; his w. Joanna d. 18 Feb. 1675-6. 4. Francis, had a grant of land in 1638, and in 1642 had a dwelling-house near the spot now occupied by the church on the N. W. corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets. His chil. were Francis; Samuel; Thomas; Anna, m. James Kidder about 1650; Sarah, b. 3 Ap. 1643; John, b. 20 Mar. 1644-5. His w. Katherine d. 28 Dec. 1648, and he m. wid. Elizabeth Periman 6 Dec. 1653. Mr. Moore d. 20 Aug. 1671, a. 85; his w. Elizabeth d. 5 Nov. 1683, a. 84. 5.. Francis, s. of Francis (4), m. Albee (or Alba) Eaton 7 Sept. 1650. He res. near the junction of Spruce and Cedar streets, was Selectman thirteen years, from 1673 to 1687, and d. 23 Feb. 1688-9, a. 69; his w. Alba d. 19 Ap. 1708. They appear to have had no children. Th
ilt at the upper end of the turnpike had an enviable reputation for durability. Their makers have kept abreast of the times, and their products, both horse drawn and motor driven, are in marked contrast to those that passed the old toll gate in 1829. The Estate of Mr. Elijah Smith      to the Proprietors of the Medford Turnpike.Dr. Toll for milk cart. Passing from June 22, 1839, to January 1, 1830.$5.19 By cash2.00 —— 3.19 1830, July 5, Recd. Payment for the Proprietors James Kidder. By this scrap of paper it appears that the toll levied for the daily passage of such vehicles was ten dollars per year, and that the rule of cash before carting or payment in advance, had not then been fully established. Whoever rides over the Mystic avenue of today, finds far better conditions, though there is still room for improvement. Several railroad schemes, upon and beside it, have been broached, but none have materialized. Meanwhile Medford is slowly expanding, and som
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23.,
Medford turnpike
Corporation. (search)
ter the appointment of this committee, as the building of the Medford house commencing about this time obviated the necessity of any further action. The Medford house was built in 1805 and opened as a tavern that same year. February 13, 1804, the standing committee was directed to purchase a piece of land on or near the farm of General Derby and build a house suitable for a toll-man. The committee contracted with Buckman and Wait, carpenters, to build the house at a cost of $300.00. Mr. James Kidder was appointed toll-gatherer, his compensation for the year following to be $350.00 and the use of the house. February 22, 1805, a committee was chosen to attend the General Court and oppose the passage of the cut or canal The branch canal. through the turnpike into Mystic river which has been petitioned for by Benjamin Hall and others. June 27, 1805, voted, that in future the affairs of the corporation shall be conducted by five proprietors who shall be annually chosen directors,