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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of Grant. (search)
etail of Sherman's last movements. We have been in perfect ignorance, said Grant, of all these things; you have brought me the first authentic news. How about Kilpatrick . And I told him how, a few nights before, this officer had been surprised in bed, and his staff all captured; how he fled to the swamp, rallied his men, and, eartily. And this, then, was the disaster to Sherman's army, of which the rebels had been boasting so loudly. I expected just exactly as much, said Grant. Kilpatrick had, in fact, a most laughable adventure with a narrow escape, however, for life. He was at Sherman's headquarters the day after the surprise, and I heard him rised Hampton in return, and to more purpose, too, than he himself had been surprised. He lost a couple of hundred of prisoners, however, and some horses. But Kilpatrick kept his ground and lived to lead his dashing cavalry on many another field. How do the men seem off for shoes and for coats? asked Grant. I replied, if suff
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
some hours after Buford's attack had been made. Upon an open plain, his brigades, led by Colonels Kilpatrick and Wyndham, fell upon the enemy so furiously that General Stuart's headquarters were cap in it, commanded by Colonel I. Irvin Gregg, the other two being commanded respectively by General Kilpatrick and Colonel McIntosh. The two divisions were soon put in motion toward the Potomac, but dfor us, and terminated in driving Stuart's cavalry through the gap at Paris. On June 17th, Kilpatrick's Brigade; moving in the advance of the Second Division, fell upon the enemy at Aldie, and thel Stahl, made it necessary to organize a third division, the command of which was given to General Kilpatrick. General Buford, with his division, in advance of our army, on July 1st, first encounteredto his support, is well known to every one familiar with the history of the great battle. General Kilpatrick's division marched from Frederick well to the right, at Hanover engaged the enemy's cavalr
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
his artillery, and that the field remained in the undisputed possession of Stuart, save that from the opposite hills a fierce artillery duel was maintained until night. I would remind him how the Federal cavalry was handled after Gettysburg, on the road between Hagerstown and Williamsport, when this limping cavalry giant raised the siege of our wagon trains which were huddled together on the bank of the Potomac. I would remind him of The Buckland races, on the 19th of October, 1863, when Kilpatrick's Division was chased, with horses at full gallop, from within three miles of Warrenton to Buckland Mills, and only by this rapid flight escaped being crushed between Hampton's and Fitz Lee's Brigades. Nor must the battle near Trevillian's Station, in June, 1864, be forgotten, where the entire strength of the cavalry of both armies was concentrated. Had Sheridan been able to carry out his plans, the speedy evacuation of Richmond must have followed; but he was met and successfully opposed
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
he Potomac had effectually prevented Lee's cavalry from obtaining any information in Virginia with reference to the movements of that army. Now, on arriving at Frederick City, Maryland, my corps was reinforced by a third division, commanded by Kilpatrick, Custer, and Farnsworth, and it is assuming nothing to assert that what had been done by my two divisions in Virginia could be accomplished by three divisions with more ease and certainty in Maryland. Two days after I arrived at Frederick Cthe north of our army, in which event I should have the cavalry so placed that he would not be able to escape us. General Meade then decided to leave the affair with me, and, as I expected, three or four days after, near a place called Hanover, Kilpatrick's Division met Stuart's command loaded down with plunder, which was recaptured, and, after a severe fight, Stuart was compelled to make such a detour that he only joined Lee at Gettysburg on the second day of the battle, July 2d. The Army o
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
vements preceding the battle, by the interposition of Gregg's and Kilpatrick's Cavalry. Stuart was thereby compelled to make a wide detour, othe action (July 3d) the cavalry had been operating on the flanks-Kilpatrick's Division on the left, and Gregg's Division on the right, and, iGeneral Buford, with the First Division, took the left flank, General Kilpatrick, with the Third Division, the centre, and General Gregg, withed as well as could be, but when the column of Stuart was struck, Kilpatrick was followed up by Gregg. In the concentration upon Gettysburg, directing that Custer's Brigade should at once join its division (Kilpatrick's) on the left. Accordingly, McIntosh's Brigade was ordered to r just in time to repulse an attempt by some of our cavalry (under Kilpatrick) to reach the rear of the Confederate line, by way of Hunterstownn Brigade had withdrawn from the field for the purpose of joining Kilpatrick near Round Top, McIntosh, who had looked well over the ground, de
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
omac, that large columns of the enemy's cavalry were moving towards the right of our line. At the same time I received an order from Major General Pleasonton, through an aide-de-camp, to send the First Brigade of the Third Division to join General Kilpatrick on the left. The First Brigade of my division was sent to relieve the brigade of the Third Division. This change having been made, a strong line of skirmishers displayed by the enemy was evidence that the enemy's cavalry had gained our riblivion that portion which narrates the defeat of his forces in the greatest effort made by him during the campaign — the battle itself. My advance reached Gettysburg July 2d, just in time to thwart a move of the enemy's cavalry Under Kilpatrick. upon our rear by way of Hunterstown, after a fierce engagement, in which Hampton's Brigade performed gallant service, a series of charges compelling the enemy to leave the field and abandon his purpose. I took my position that day on the York
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
The situation of my command was peculiar. Originally organized as a corps under General Sherman, the commanding general of the Military Division of the Mississippi, and not having been transferred, it still formed a legitimate part of his command, wherever he might be. It will be remembered that General Sherman, with the main body of his army, was at that time in North Carolina, moving northward. Before leaving North Alabama, he had instructed me to report, with my entire corps, except Kilpatrick's Division, to Major General George H. Thomas, to assist in the operations against Hood. It was the intention of General Sherman, however, as developed in frequent conversations with me while lying at Gaylesville, Alabama, in October, 1864, that as soon as Hood could be disposed of, and the cavalry could be reorganized and remounted, I should gather together every man and horse that could be made fit for service, and march through the richer parts of Alabama and Georgia, for the purpose o
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
th Virginia Regiment charged a regiment of Federal cavalry, driving a portion of it toward Baltimore, and the rest toward Frederick. From this point Stuart proceeded to Hanover, in Pennsylvania, where he engaged a large cavalry force under General Kilpatrick. In this fight the Second North Carolina Regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel William H. Payne, formerly captain of the Black Horse. He bore himself with conspicuous gallantry, and was taken prisoner in a charge which he led, the regiment sustaining considerable loss in killed and wounded. The effort of Kilpatrick to detain Stuart was foiled by this fight, and he moved on to Carlisle barracks, which, with his artillery, he set on fire. From Carlisle the Southern cavalry marched to Gettysburg, and took position on Lee's left, near Huntersville. They took part in the battle on the memorable 3d of July, 1863, in which the Southern Confederacy received its death wound. Upon Meade's advance into Virginia, Lee retired to t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
ld have delighted Napoleon. In the operations of 1863, culminating at Gettysburg, he was charged with misconception or disobedience of orders in separating himself from the main column, although he protested to me, with the utmost earnestness and feeling, that he had been guilty of neither. Then the hurried and adventurous scenes followed, when General Lee attempted, in October, 1863, to cut off General Meade at Manassas, when the cavalry was the only arm which effected anything, and General Kilpatrick was nearly crushed near Bucklands — the brief campaign of Mine Run-and the furious wrestle between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, in May, 1864. When General Grant moved toward Spottsylvania Court-House, it was Stuart who, according to Northern historians, so obstructed the roads as to enable General Lee to interpose his army at this important point. Had this not been effected, Richmond, it would seem, must have fallen; Stuart thus having the melancholy glory of prolonging, for an a