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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
mmand, and a day or two later, Stoneman with about 700 mounted men surrendered to Gen. Iverson who had been sent after him. When brought into Macon as prisoners of war, Gen. Stoneman and his staff officers, who were jaded by hard riding and lack of sleep on their raid, seemed much mortified on learning by what sort of force they had been repelled. Again, in the latter part of November of the same year, Gen. Sherman, having begun his march to the sea, the fifteenth corps of his army, with Kilpatrick's cavalry forming the extreme right of the army, made a feint upon Macon, and there was a skirmish with the small Confederate force that could be sent out from Macon. The ordnance battalion was called out, but did not see the enemy. Finally, at the very end of the war a serious move upon Macon was made by the heavy column of cavalry commanded by Gen. Jas. Wilson. This force came down from north Alabama, had a heavy fight with Forrest at Selma, and then swept eastward through Montgomery
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Major Andrew Reid Venable, Jr. [from Richmond, Va., Times-Dispatch.] (search)
e. Suffice it to say, that he discovered a movement of the enemy's infantry that neither he nor Lee had suspected. As usual, he selected Venable to carry the news to the commanding general, instructing him to ride by way of Auburn, which Lomax, with his brigade of horse, was supposed to hold. Venable sped upon his mission, and rode confidently into Auburn, only to ride out as fast as he could put spur to horse under a tempest of bullets, for Lomax had just been driven from the place and Kilpatrick's troopers held all the roads. But the trusted staff officer, with more than one touch-and-go escape, made a wide detour, knowing every foot of the country even in the darkness, and safely delivered the message to Lee. In those heroic days, compliments did not fly thick and fast, as in the great Spanish War, and to be mentioned in dispatches meant a good deal. Of this daring ride, Stuart says simply, in his official report: Major Andrew R. Venable, Jr., A. A. and Inspector-General, d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ht on the morning of the 1st of July, he had gained positive information of the enemy's position and movements. The other two cavalry divisions under Gregg and Kilpatrick, moved on the right flank of the army and were busily engaged looking up Stuart, who was now discovered to be moving still further to their right. Kilpatrick sKilpatrick succeeded in coming up with him at Hanover, where a sharp engagement ensued, but Stuart, though superior in numbers, could not afford to have his progress delayed, and he shook off Kilpatrick as quickly as possible and resumed his march. In a letter written by General Reynolds, on the 30th, to Butterfield, chief of staff, he saysKilpatrick as quickly as possible and resumed his march. In a letter written by General Reynolds, on the 30th, to Butterfield, chief of staff, he says: If we are to fight a defensive battle in this vicinity, the proper position is just north of Emmittsburg, covering the Plank road to Taneytown. He (the enemy), will undoubtedly endeavor to turn our left by way of Fairfield, and the mountain road leading down into the Frederick and Emmittsburg pike near Mt. St. Mary's College.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
as we found them, the ordinary wear and tear of an army of occupation alone excepted. We had so often before our eyes the reverse of this wherever your army swept through Virginia, that we were thoroughly convinced of the justice of a stern retaliation. It is no pleasure to me to have to recall the scenes of those days, nor do I do so in any spirit of vindictiveness, but I simply tell the truth in justification of an act which Mr. Hoke claims was without justification. We had followed Kilpatrick (I think it was), in his raid through Madison, Greene and other counties, and had seen the cattle shot or hamstrung in the barnyards, the agricultural implements burned, the feather beds and clothing of the women and children cut in shreds in mere wantonness, farmhouse after farmhouse stripped of every particle of provisions, private carriages cut and broken up, and women in tears lamenting all this. I do not put down here anything that I did not see myself. We had seen a thousand ruined
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War time story of Dahlgren's raid. (search)
lled and wounded, and about thirty prisoners remaining in our hands. They then pursued their way towards the Piping Tree Ferry. We had two men wounded, of whom, we are pained to say, Lieut. Ditty was shot in both eyes. Thus has passed away Kilpatrick's second attempt at raiding into Richmond. He has been pretty well hackled by our forces, having lost, probably, at least one-tenth of his force in killed and captured. As far as the grand objects of his undertaking were concerned, he has realroads the extent is not yet known. The Fredericksburg road has had one of its engines re-burnt; it was burnt in the former raid—and three or four small gondolas. The Central road is thought to have suffered considerably. As if waiting for Kilpatrick to get through, Butler is understood to be moving again. Some of his cavalry appeared yesterday at Tunstall's Station, it is said; and it is alleged that a heavy co-operating column of infantry (twelve regiments), are at the Burnt Ordinary, in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
is only 45 or 50 miles from Seneca ford), and at that earlier hour he probably would not have found the Federal Cavalry on that road. In his report Gen. Stuart says he reached Westminster at 5 P. M. and camped at Union Mills, midway between Westminster and Littletown, on the Gettysburg road (p. 695). Scouts reported that the Federal cavalry had reached Littletown during the night. But for this it would appear Stuart would have marched to Gettysburg. Instead he marched to Hanover. Gen. Kilpatrick in his report says Stuart was making for Littletown. Gen. E. P. Alexander, in his important work, p. 375, says that had Gen. Stuart's column here followed the direct road via Littletown to Gettysburg, only about sixteen miles away, it could have occupied Gettysburg before 11 A. M. on the 30th, when it would have found itself in good position in front of Lee's army, then concentrated at Cashtown. And he adds that in that case Lee's army would have occupied some strong position betwee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Col. Ulric Dahlgren, the defeated Raider. (search)
ugh, undressed pine coffin, and found it marked in stencil on the lid of the coffin with his name—Ulric Dahlgren. Colonel Dahlgren had been killed by a squad of men while rapidly retreating from the attack on Richmond, in which he had been defeated. On his person was found the order to his men, should they be able to enter Richmond, to at once proceed to the Libby Prison and deliver the prisoners; and also to President Davis' house and take him dead or alive to Colonel Dahlgren or General Kilpatrick. The Libby Prison, so called, and the President's residence were clearly described in the aforesaid orders, some of which were also found on the person of the few followers of Dahlgren who were taken prisoners by the Confederates. The fact that Dahlgren had himself entered Richmond and thus familiarized himself with these locations was thus made plain. The fact of these orders was made known to President Davis, and he directed that these orders and Dahlgren's body should be se