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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 252 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 148 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 130 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 96 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 95 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 85 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 76 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 76 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 72 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Judson Kilpatrick or search for Judson Kilpatrick in all documents.

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; and the Fourth corps above mentioned, with Kilpatrick's cavalry, were put in the most efficient cove thousand five hundred, under Brigadier-General Judson Kilpatrick, and the artillery reduced to tlly realized. During the twenty-second, General Kilpatrick made a good feint on Macon, driving the he other by way of Louisville, in support of Kilpatrick's cavalry. In person I shifted to the rightfrom General Howard, General Slocum, and General Kilpatrick, and their subordinates respectively, wi, engineer regiment, and supply-train of General Kilpatrick's cavalry, the whole preceded by the Firf the fifteenth, the command went into camp; Kilpatrick near Jonesboro, the heads of the two infantr command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton roequently modified these directions, ordering Kilpatrick not to assault the works. General Hazen, of completed, and take Fort McAllister. General Kilpatrick made his reconnoissance on the twelfth, [17 more...]
November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, setting fire to the bridge. Some mounted infantry that he had in advance drove them from the bridge in time to put out the fire, and save every thing but the planking. The bridge was immediately repaired, and detained the column just forty minutes. General Kilpatrick crossed the Flint River at the bridge near Jonesboro, at seven A. M. Finding the enemy had left that place, he followed him to Lovejoy, where he occupied the strong position there, having two brigades of cavalry and two pieces of artillery, and holding the old rebel works. The General charged the works with dismounted cavalry, and carried them, driving back the enemy. Subsequently, the enemy's. artillery was overtaken by another charging column, and captured. He drove the enemy beyond Bear Station, capturing over fifty prisoner
November 17, 1864. Moved to Jackson and its vicinity in three columns, encamping the right near Indian Springs, and the left at Hendrick's Mill. General Kilpatrick moved to Towaligo Creek. Some cavalry of the enemy crossed the creek, burning the bridges.
November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; General Blair, with his command, via Bluntsville. The head of the right column encamped at Clinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out towardGeneral Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the track. The road was struck in two or three places by the cavalry, beside the above, and a train of cars burned. It rained hard during the entire night.
ces of the most inexcusable and wanton acts, such as the breaking open of trunks, taking silver plate, etc. I have taken measures to prevent it, and I believe they will be effectual. The inhabitants are generally terrified, and believe us a thousand times worse than we are. Having soldiers in the command who have been bitten by blood-hounds, permission has been given to kill them. Permit me to commend to you Generals Blair and Osterhaus, and the officers and men under them; also General Kilpatrick and his command, for their faithfulness, energy, and untiring exertions to make our march a complete success. While the pleasant weather lasted, the marches were easily made; but as soon as the rains came on, the roads became very heavy, and the poorer mules broke down. But we have found a number in the country that have more than replaced our losses. The members of my staff have given me material aid, and I hope to be able to reward them substantially, at some time, for faithful
little left of the old bridge, except the posts. This bridge measured a thousand feet in length. The General-in-Chief, in the above order, had directed General Kilpatrick to aid me in opening communication with the fleet. I therefore sent him across the pontoon-bridges, near Fort Argyle, to reconnoitre Fort McAllister and the inlets in that vicinity, and, if practicable, to take the Fort. General Sherman himself subsequently modified these directions, ordering Kilpatrick not to assault the works. General Hazen, of the Fifteenth corps, was directed to hold his division in readiness to cross King's Bridge the moment it was completed, and take Fort McAllister. General Kilpatrick made his reconnoissance on the twelfth, drove in the outposts at McAllister, and reported the Fort defended by a garrison of some two hundred men with several heavy guns, bearing on the land approaches. The morning of the thirteenth, I accompanied General Sherman to Doctor Cheves's Rice-Mill, whe
and Brookfield, Commissary of Subsistence, my command has always been well supplied. Dr. Wise, Surgeon-in-Chief Division, Captains Brink (Inspector-General,) Day, (Provost-Marshal,) and my Aids, Captain Hayes, and Lieutenants Holling-worth, Oliver, Fuller, and Griffin, have each, in his respective place, more than fulfilled my expectations. Captain Estes, my Assistant Adjutant-General, deserves special notice, not only for the faithful discharge of his eminent duties, but for his reckless daring and invaluable assistance in every skirmish and engagement. This officer deserves, and I earnestly hope that he may be promoted. Accompanying this report will be found a nominal list of killed, wounded, and missing, also Provost-Marshal's statement of captures and property destroyed. I also inclose the reports of my brigade and regimental commanders, which I respectfully request may be taken as a part of this my official report. Respectfully submitted. J. Kilpatrick, Brigadier-General.
Here I received orders from General Davis to hold the town until all the trains of the Fourteenth army corps and General Kilpatrick's trains had passed, and then follow as an escort. About seven o'clock P. M., the trains having passed, I ordered , 1864. December first, at ten o'clock A. M., division moved from camp near Louisville, Georgia, in company with General Kilpatrick's division of cavalry, and went into camp at five P. M. on the bank of Buck Head Creek. During the day considerablnnah and Augusta road, and during the night thoroughly destroyed several miles of railroad track. December fourth, General Kilpatrick attacked the enemy's cavalry one mile from Thomas Station, and drove them in confusion through Waynesboro and two miles beyond. Division followed up and supported General Kilpatrick during the day and then made a night march to Alexander. December fifth, reached Jacksonboro. December sixth, arrived at Beaver Dam Creek and joined the other two divisions of th
ek, I found a number of rail defences, which had been erected a few days previous during a fight between the cavalry of Kilpatrick and Wheeler. The bridge was destroyed, and the enemy's pickets fired upon us from the eastern bank. These were soon dlonel Dustin's brigade, of that division, having been directed to report to me, was assigned the charge of the train of Kilpatrick's cavalry, which was given me to guard. Lieutenant Newkirk's battery was also under my orders, and was placed in rear troops of the brigade were to-day in rear of the wagon-trains of the division, in which were included the trains of General Kilpatrick's cavalry command, and did not march from the camp of the preceding night until one P. M. The roads were in a horrihe passage of the trains until three P. M. Brought up trains of Twentieth corps, one division Fourteenth corps, and General Kilpatrick's cavalry. Third division in rear, Second brigade in centre. Crossed Big Creek and went into camp at midnight abo
Millen. 2d. Continued our march the whole day. 3d. In the morning threw two bridges; one over Buckhead Creek, and also one over Rosebury Creek. Took the same bridge up in the evening, and marched six miles on the road to Jacksonboro. 4th. Marched all day, and camped near Lumpkin Station, on the Waynesboro Railroad. 5th. Marched twelve miles, and camped on Beaver Dam Creek, and by ten o'clock at night, we built one trestle-bridge over Beaver Dam Creek for Generals Baird and Kilpatrick. 6th. Marched seventeen miles. 7th. Marched twenty-five miles, reaching Ebenezer Creek; commenced building a trestlebridge over Ebenezer Creek, working my men all night. 8th. Finished the trestle-bridge in the morning, and also threw a pontoon-bridge over Lockmer Creek, four miles in advance. 9th. Took up both bridges, and moved forward during the night toward Savannah. 10th. Continued our march. 11th. Marched six miles and camped near the Savannah River, within six
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