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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 5 3 Browse Search
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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Augusta King. (search)
To Miss Augusta King. Northampton, October 21, 1840. My heart has written you several epistles in reply, but the hand could not be spared. Oh for some spiritual daguerreotype, by which thoughts might spontaneously write themselves! How should you like that? Would you dare venture upon it for the sake of the convenience? Oh, but you should have seen Lonetown woods in the rich beauty of autumnal foliage! Color taking its fond and bright farewell of form,--Like the imagination giving a deeper, richer, warmer glow to old familiar truths, before the winter of rationalism comes, and places trunk and branches in naked outline against the clear cold sky. I have had a charming letter from Mr. W., a real German effusion, filling matter brimful of life; so that statues beseech, and are sad that we do not understand their language ; and flowers dance in troops to wind-music; and the brook goes tumbling to the river, roaring as he falls, and the river smiles that he comes to her un
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Augusta King. (search)
To Miss Augusta King. New York, September 19, 1843. A day or two after Parker left, A. and L. called to see me. I asked, What brings you to New York? I don't know, said Mr. A.; it seems a miracle that we are here. But whatever the miracle might be, I believe it restored no blind to sight. Mr. C. and J. H. went to hear a discussion between them and W. H. C. It was held in a very small room, the air was stifling, and both came home with a headache. I asked Mr. C. what they talked about? I don't know. But can't you tell anything they said? For some time he insisted that he could not, but being unmercifully urged, he at last said, L. divided man into three states; the disconscious, the conscious, and the unconscious. The disconscious is the state of a pig; the conscious is the baptism by water; and the unconscious is the baptism by fire. I laughed, and said, Well, how did the whole discussion affect your mind? Why, after I had heard them talk a few minutes, replied he, I'l
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Augusta King. (search)
To Miss Augusta King. New York, October 30, 1844. Emerson has sent me his new volume. Essays, Second Series. As usual, it is full of deep and original sayings, and touches of exceeding beauty. But, as usual, it takes away my strength .... What is the use of telling us that everything is scene-painting and counterfeit, that nothing is real, that everything eludes us? That no single thing in life keeps the promise it makes? Or, if any keeps it, keeps it like the witches to Macbeth? Enough of this conviction is forced upon us by experience, without having it echoed in literature. My being is so alive and earnest that it resists and abhors these ghastly, eluding spectres. It abhors them and says: Be ye ghosts, and dwell among ghosts. But though all the world be dead, and resolved into vapory elements, I will live? Emerson would smile at this; because it shows how deeply I feel the fact I quarrel with. But after all, if we extend our vision into the regions of faith, all
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
Captain, the Modoc chief, 220. Jackson, General, Andrew, and the Seminole War, 219. Jackson, Francis, 260. Jay, John, 188. Jefferson, Thomas, testimony of against slavery, 133. John Brent, by Theodore Winthrop, 164. John Brown Song, the, 157. Johnson, Andrew, speech of, at Nashville, 184. Johnson, Oliver, 232. Johnson, Rev., Samuel, 96, 214. Julian, George W., letter to, 187. Juvenile Miscellany, VII., 10, 256. K. Kent, Rev. Mr., characterizes Mrs. Child. 55. King, Miss Augusta, letters to, 37, 52, 56. L. Labor question, the, 199. Lafayette's observation of the change in color of the slaves in Virginia, 126. Laws of the Slave States, against intermarriage, 126; against negro testimony, 126; in regard to punishment of slaves, 127; by which the master appropriated a slave's earnings, 128; prohibiting education of the blacks, 128. Leonowens, Mrs. A. H., her book on Siam, 210, 216. Letters from New York, Mrs. Child's, XI., 45. Light