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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 11 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
vilization. We halted in front of the house, and after cooking and eating, I walked up to the ranch, which is a comfortable, well-furnished wooden building. Mr. and Mrs. King had gone to Brownsville; but we were received by Mrs. Bee, the wife of the Brownsville general, who had heard I was on the road. She is a nice livMrs. King had gone to Brownsville; but we were received by Mrs. Bee, the wife of the Brownsville general, who had heard I was on the road. She is a nice lively little woman, a red-hot Southerner, glorying in the facts that she has no Northern relations or friends, and that she is a member of the Church of England. Mr. King first came to Texas as a steamboat captain, but now owns an immense tract of country, with 16,000 head of cattle, situated, however, in a wild and almost uninhaMr. King first came to Texas as a steamboat captain, but now owns an immense tract of country, with 16,000 head of cattle, situated, however, in a wild and almost uninhabited district. King's Ranch is distant from Brownsville only 125 miles, and we have been six days in reaching it. After drying our clothes and our food after the rain of last night, we started again at 2.30 P. M. We now entered a boundless and most fertile prairie, upon which, as far as the eye could reach, cattle were
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
cribed as a victory the word Fair-oaks, which was the engagement in which the regiment had lost its first color. Mr. Butler King, a member of Congress, whose acquaintance I had made in the Spottswood Hotel, took me to spend the evening at Mrs. S a very pleasant evening with Mrs. S -- , who had been much in England, and had made a large acquaintance there. Mr. Butler King is a Georgian gentleman, also very agreeable and well informed. It is surprising to hear the extraordinary equanimiland in the centre of the stream. I spent another very agreeable evening at Mrs. S-‘s, and met General Randolph, Mr. Butler King, and Mr. Conrad there; also Colonel Johnston, aid-de-camp to the President, who told me that they had been forced, iSecretary of War; but it is supposed that he and the President did not quite hit it off together. Mr. Conrad as well as Mr. King is a member of Congress, and he explained to me that, at the beginning of the war, each State was most desirous ofbeing
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
State, had issued a proclamation for the election of a convention to frame a State constitution. In due time the elections were held, and the convention was assembled at Monterey. Dr. Semple was elected president; and Gwin, Sutter, Halleck, Butler King, Sherwood, Gilbert, Shannon, and others, were members. General Smith took no part in this convention, but sent me down to watch the proceedings, and report to him. The only subject of interest was the slavery question. There were no slaves tf that acquired by the common labors of all sections of the Union in the war with Mexico. Still, in California there was little feeling on the subject. I never heard General Smith, who was a Louisianian, express any opinion about it. Nor did Butler King, of Georgia, ever manifest any particular interest in the matter. A committee was named to draft a constitution, which in due time was reported, with the usual clause, then known as the Wilmot Proviso, excluding slavery; and during the debate
Americans in Paris. --The Paris correspondent of the New York Commercial, writing on the 8th instant, says: Mr. Faulkner, late American Minister at Paris, has just returned here from a month's voyage through England, Scotland and Ireland. His two youngest children are still here at school, and Mr. F. protests that his stay in Europe is entirely for his pleasure, and in no way connected with politics. Mr. Butler King is about to bring out a brochure on the subject of the American quarrel for the enlightenment of the French. Mr. Spencer, American Consol at Paris, has been suspended from his functions by Mr. Seward, and a Mr. Dudley has been appointed by Dayton, as vice-consul until a consul is appointed. It was reported that Mr. Spencer, who is a New Yorker, was removed for Secession doctrines; but Mr. S. on the contrary is strong for the Union, and was removed perhaps entirely because he was appointed by Mr. Buchanan.
Sale of cotton. Whilst events have compelled us to relinquish the idea that cotton is an absolute monarch, we are not yet willing to abandon the thought that he is at any rate a limited King, and may yet do much to extricate us from our difficulties. This, however, depends upon the allegiance of his subjects at home. If they are disloyal, and are willing to sell their King and country, his kingdom must soon be ended and his sceptre pass away. We are sorry to hear, upon what we consider King and country, his kingdom must soon be ended and his sceptre pass away. We are sorry to hear, upon what we consider a reliable source, that a brisk trade in cotton has been going on from's principal Southern seaport, as many as twenty vessels being engaged in the illicit traffic, that a large amount has found its way over Texas to Mexico; that a new device has been lately hit upon of selling it to Union men in East Tennessee, who are accumulating the article in that region to be disposed of to the Yankees, and that disloyal man in North Alabama are openly selling it to the invaders. Such conduct as this is i
hern Confederacy was unfortunate in their selection of their civil representatives abroad. Mr. Fancey, besides his unfortunate record in regard to slavery, was not a man of the temperature and weight for England.--Judge Rost possesses neither the force nor fact requisite and strange to say he was distasteful of the French because of one of the very reasons for which he was appointed, viz; because he was a Frenchman. The French do not wish to be instructed about another by a Frenchman. Butler King, who represented the commercial interests of the State of Georgia, did what he could while here, but, in a matter of etiquette, some disagreement grow up between him and the others, who refused intercourse with him. "Since I have been here a rendezvous has been established by a large number of persons belonging to and in the interest of the South. It has embraced many French citizens of America. Not one of this col clave was, perhaps a man who himself exerted any great influence, b