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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 95 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 36 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 17 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 15 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 15 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 40: social relations and incidents of Cabinet life, 1853-57. (search)
several times. At that time Mr. O'Connor conceived the respect and regard for my husband which bore such priceless fruit in our day of helplessness and sorrow. Mr. and Mrs. Charles King, of Columbia College, spent the winter in Washington, and Mrs. King remains an ideal old lady to me, her accomplishments were so varied and heMrs. Charles King, of Columbia College, spent the winter in Washington, and Mrs. King remains an ideal old lady to me, her accomplishments were so varied and her judgment, breeding, and temper were so perfect. Mrs. Gracie was also there — a dignified, agreeable woman. General Gracie, of the Confederate Army, her splendidly gallant son, afterward died on the battle-field and his loss was bitterly mourned by the whole army as well as by his beautiful young widow. Mr. Edward Everett also Mrs. King remains an ideal old lady to me, her accomplishments were so varied and her judgment, breeding, and temper were so perfect. Mrs. Gracie was also there — a dignified, agreeable woman. General Gracie, of the Confederate Army, her splendidly gallant son, afterward died on the battle-field and his loss was bitterly mourned by the whole army as well as by his beautiful young widow. Mr. Edward Everett also spent the winter there, a man whom to know was to admire, for his social graces were in excess even of his oratory. The Honorable A. Dudley Mann remained throughout the season in the city, and then I first beheld this perfect man. To all the accomplishments of a trained diplomat he united every Christian virtue; with a detestatio
August 8. This evening, at Baltimore, Md., Charles King, from North Carolina, was arrested by officer Stevens, of the Southern District, by order of Major-General Dix, on the charge of being concerned in the raising of a number of men, whose purpose it was to organize themselves into a crew, and take passage on some boat, intending to capture it in the same manner as the St. Nicholas, and then turn her into a pirate.--Baltimore Patriot, August 9. The Nineteenth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers passed through Philadelphia for the seat of war.--N. Y. Herald, August 9. F. K. Zollicoffer was appointed a brigadier-general in the rebel army, and assigned to the command of the Department of East Tennessee. On assuming his command, he issued a proclamation assuring all who desire peace, that they can have it by quietly and harmlessly pursuing their lawful avocations.--(Doe. 171.) The Massachusetts Fifteenth Regiment, under the command of Colonel Charles Devens, left Camp S
emy, but soon formed again and fired, but received no reply or pursuit from the enemy. Not over two hundred were missing, out of nine hundred engaged. The rebel loss was fearful. Lieut.--Col. Creighton captured the rebels' colors and two prisoners. The following is a list of national officers known to be killed: Captain Dyer, Company D, of Painesville; Captain Shurtleff, Company C, of Oberlin; Captain Sterling, Company I; Adjutant Deforest, of Cleveland; Lieutenant Charles Warrent; Sergeant-Major King, of Warren. The field-officers are all safe. The Twenty-fifth regiment of Indiana Volunteers left Evansville for St. Louis, Mo.--Louisville Journal, August 28. Henry Wilson, Senator from Massachusetts, was commissioned to organize a regiment of infantry, with a battery of artillery and a company of sharpshooters attached. In his call he asks the loyal young men of Massachusetts, who fully comprehend the magnitude of the contest for the unity and existence of the Republic,
Unionists a loss of five killed and sixteen wounded, all of them cavalry, including Lieut. Decker, of the Harris cavalry, killed; Col. Fitzpatrick, wounded, and a valuable scout, named Britten, badly wounded. Col. Bayard's horse was badly wounded under him. Immediately after making their escape across the Rappahannock bridge, opposite Fredericksburgh, the rebels applied the torch to it, and thus temporarily delayed progress into the town.--(Doc. 143.) In the afternoon, Lieut. Wood, of Gen. King's staff, Lieut. Campbell, Fourth artillery, and Major Duffie, of the Harris light cavalry, crossed the Rappahannock under a flag of truce, and communicated with the municipal authorities of the city. The City Councils had called a meeting immediately after the appearance of the forces, and appointed a committee consisting of the Mayor, Mr. Slaughter, three members from each Board, and three citizens, to confer with Gen. Augur relative to the occupation of Fredericksburgh and the pro
Hicks, in Jackson County, Mo., killing seventeen and hanging two who were engaged in the robbery of the steamer Sam Gaty. He also recovered a portion of the contrabands captured from that steamer, besides taking twenty-one of the guerrillas' horses, and their camps, with all their equipage, ammunition, etc.--General Curtis's Despatch. As the National gunboat St. Clair was passing Palmyra, twenty-four miles above Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River, she was fired into by a section of King's rebel Missouri battery, belonging to the army under General Van Dorn. The third shot struck the supply-pipe of the steamer, rendering her unmanageable, and wounding two of her crew. She was taken in tow by the steamer Luminous, and carried to Cairo, Ill.--General Wright, in command of the National forces in California, issued a proclamation which concluded as follows: Although the great mass of people on the Pacific coast are eminently patriotic and devoted to the Union, yet, fellow-citiz
April 12. Information having been received by General King, commanding at Yorktown, Va., of the presence of a large body of cavalry in Gloucester County, Colonel A. II. Grimshaw, Fourth Delaware volunteers, in command of the post at Gloucester Point, was ordered to send out a detachment of infantry for the purpose of reconnoitring the enemy's position, and, if possible, driving him from some mills which he was reported to occupy, about ten miles beyond the Union lines. Lieutenant-Colonel Tevis, Fourth Delaware, started out at two P. M., with one hundred and fifty volunteers from his own regiment, and having ascertained the force of the rebels to be about two hundred cavalry, under the corn mand of Colonel Goodwin, pushed forward to at tack them. The enemy fell back, leaving, however, two of their pickets in the hands of the Nationals. They were ridden down and capture by Colonel Tevis, Lieutenant Tower and Dr Hopkins, surgeon of the regiment. The detachment returned to camp
ss potent in the confederate States through their representatives in Congress, than the people of Great Britain in Parliament? We do not believe it. Parliament has no power, like that of Congress, to pass a law in spite of the King's veto; yet no King, since 1688, has dared to veto a bill passed by Parliament. No King has dared to defy public opinion in the appointment of the national counsellors and the commanders of the armies, setting up personal favoritism and partisanship above efficiencyKing has dared to defy public opinion in the appointment of the national counsellors and the commanders of the armies, setting up personal favoritism and partisanship above efficiency. . . . . The legislative power which Congress possesses, as to measures and men, can control the government and force efficiency into the administration whether in the appointment of cabinet officers, commanders of armies and bureau officers, or in the management of our diplomacy, our finances, our military operations, our naval preparations, and the efficiency of our bureaus of conscription, commissary stores and quartermaster stores. But this can never be done by those who look upon Presi
was made. As the boats moved up, instead of seeing the expected cavalry, they were saluted by heavy volleys of musketry from the river-banks. The enemy proving too strong, the party was obliged to return to the vessel. At the same time, Lieutenant King, of Colonel Jourdan's staff, with a body of men in boats, moved up Bear Inlet: he found and burned one of the vessels sought, together with its cargo of salt and leather. He returned to the gunboat, bringing with him forty-three negro refug him forty-three negro refugees. The whole expedition arrived at Beaufort on the morning of the twenty-sixth ultimo, without the loss of a man. Great credit is due Colonel Jourdan and the officers and men of his command, together with the officers and men of the navy, for the efficient service performed. The Commanding General tenders his thanks especially to Colonel Jourdan, Captain Cuff, and Lieutenant King, of the army, and to Commander Dove and Lieutenants Huse and Cowie, of the navy.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
treat of Jackson toward Thoroughfare Gap. With King's division in advance, McDowell, marching towarhe vicinity. After the firing ceased I saw General King, who, determining to maintain his position,ers to Sigel and Reynolds. The engagement of King's division was reported to me about 10 o'clock also direct to General King, But see Captain Charles King's denial on page 495.--Editors. severaln left open by the wholly unexpected retreat of King's division, due to the fact that he was not sup9th to Porter, Push forward with your corps and King's division, which you will take with you upon G to move forward rapidly with his own corps and King's division of McDowell's corps, which was thereg back. This attack along the pike was made by King's division near sunset; but, as Porter made no ll be sufficient: Generals McDowell and King:--I found it impossible to communicate by crossthe day I advanced Porter's corps, supported by King's division of McDowell's corps, and supported a[18 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., In vindication of General Rufus King. (search)
fore and after the words and also direct to General King, would say that orders were sent to King seother superior officer; no staff-officer of General King saw or heard of General Pope that night; anl, Pope has since admitted that he sent none to King. Early in 1863, when those words first met GGeneral King's eyes, he wrote at once to his late commander to have the error rectified. General Popthat time he thought he had sent one message to King by a staff-officer. I quote from his letter noaff. He had witnessed the severe engagement of King's division, west of Groveton, and some time aft off; but he remembered no message from Pope to King, and if there was one, which he doubts, he did deliver it, for he never attempted to return to King, but went on in search of McDowell until he fousclosed, and that none at all came from Pope to King is beyond peradventure. Indeed, in 1878 Generafter the fierce conflict that raged at sunset. King's orders were to march to Centreville, which wa[10 more...]
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