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member of the rebel Legislature of Tennessee, was reported to me as being concealed in his house, but after a minute investigation he could not be found. During these proceedings I sent out patrols to scout the vicinity from Paris to Humboldt, about 5 miles in advance, who did not find or see anything; on the contrary, reported the country clear of any armed troops. Regarding rebel forces, I was informed by several individuals, at different places and different times, that- 1. Clay King, with his force, 500 to 600 strong, has been ordered to Lexington, toward the Mississippi, about 55 miles from Camp Lowe. 2. Two companies of independent cavalry, or mounted men, poorly armed and equipped, were stationed at Humboldt, sending out scout. ing parties toward Paris. 3. The last party of this kind was seen at Paris last Thursday. 4. The troops garrisoned at Memphis were diminishing daily by being ordered toward Corinth. In my opinion the occupation of Paris by a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
of whose heroic deeds it would be pleasant to tell you, but time will not permit. I did not mention the name of poor Clay King. He deserves a better fate. Let me tell you one instance showing the gallantry of of this man: At Booneville, Miss., 1st Alabama in the center and Wirt Adams on the right, we charged upon a force under General Sheridan at Booneville, Miss. Clay King's battalion was left to protect our rear. We had driven the Federal cavalry away while they were feeding their horses on wheat, and Clay King permitted his men to take the bits out of their horses' mouths and let them turn into the fence corners and feed, while the other forces were fighting in the front. While in this position a column of Federal cavalry charged them in the rear. King then caused his men to mount, without bits in their horses' mouths, and charged the enemy and drove them back. Happy am I at the recollection of having been associated in those days with such men as the gallant McEldery,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
of Charleston, 65. Johnson, Maj., John, 67 Johnston, Gen J. E., Surrender of, 37; His Tribute to Gen. Whiting, 158. Johnston, Col., Wm. Preston, 98. Jones, Rev Dr. J. Wm , 29. Jones, Col. R. F., killed, 10. Jones, Gen., Sam, 139. Jones, Ex-Gov. T. C., Address of, 186. Jones, Hon. W. A., 301. Kanapaux's Battery, 236. Keeling, Capt. R. H., killed, 11. Kelley, Dr. J. B , 10. Kelley's Ford, Battle of, 23. Keokuk, The Ironclad, 67. Kerr, Rev. Dr., Robt. P., 277. King, Col. Clay; Gallantry of, 224. Lacoste, A. W. Gallantry of, 67. Lacy, Rev. Dr., Drury, 257. Lafayette Artillery, The, 236. Lamb. Hon. John, 300, 359. Lamb, Col. Wm , at Fort Fisher, 159. Latane, Death of Capt., 249. Lee Camp—Old Richmond, Va.; Sketch of, 241; Batteries at, 244. Lee, Chas. Carter, 353. Lee, Gen. R. E.; on Respect to Private Property, 120, 245, 294, 319. Lee, Gen., Wm. F., 247. Lincoln's Contest for President, 325, the vote for, 328; How his Election wa
ld by a man named James Conner, and that the Union men of that place had sent to Paducah, requesting that Gen. Smith should send a Federal force for the purpose of protecting Conner, who had been lodged in jail, from Confederate troops under Major Clay King, who were encamped near Feliciana. Before the Federals had time to advance, King's boys entered Mayfield, took Conner in charge, and started back to Feliciana. A short distance from Mayfield Conner broke loose from the guard, and beforlace had sent to Paducah, requesting that Gen. Smith should send a Federal force for the purpose of protecting Conner, who had been lodged in jail, from Confederate troops under Major Clay King, who were encamped near Feliciana. Before the Federals had time to advance, King's boys entered Mayfield, took Conner in charge, and started back to Feliciana. A short distance from Mayfield Conner broke loose from the guard, and before he was distant a hundred yards, he fell, riddled by bullets.