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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
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d a continent, we who have discovered in this club a new pleasure should at least be entitled to the name of Semi-Colons. So Semi-Colons they became and remained for some years. At some meetings compositions were read, and at others nothing was read, but the time was passed in a general discussion of some interesting topic previously announced. Among the members of the club were Professor Stowe, unsurpassed in Biblical learning; Judge James Hall, editor of the Western monthly; General Edward King; Mrs. Peters, afterwards founder of the Philadelphia School of Design; Miss Catherine Beecher; Mrs. Caroline Lee Hentz; E. P. Cranch; Dr. Drake; S. P. Chase, and many others who afterwards became prominent in their several walks of life. In one of her letters to Miss May, Mrs. Stowe describes one of her methods for entertaining the members of the Semi-Colon as follows:-- I am wondering as to what I shall do next. I have been writing a piece to be read next Monday evening at
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
ng into every part of the continent of a network of communication. Books of travel like Bowles's Across the continent and King's The great South began to appear, and all at once the nation awoke to a realization of its own riches, of its own picturen the realm of the short story, of George W. Cable and Charles Egbert Craddock. Cable was one of the discoveries of Edward King during his tour of the South for Scribner's monthly in 1872. It was in New Orleans that he found him working as a humsketches and stories which Cable was writing for himself and for the New Orleans papers. Some of his stories he showed to King, who advised him to send them to Scribner's. One of these, 'Sieur George, was published the following year; others came atn's Flute and violin stands by itself, and in still another such work as Margaretta Wade Deland's Old Chester tales, Grace King's Monsieur Motte, and Alice Brown's Meadow Grass. No more exquisite work, however, may be found in the whole range of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Company I, 61st Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, C. S. A. (search)
rted at the evacuation: 25. Number entered at organization: 63: Number that left Norfolk and were afterwards assigned: 62. Conspicuous for gallantry. At McCarthy's Farm: Captain Charles R. McAlpine, privates Elvin K. Casey, Wm. E. St. George, and Julius Ward and one who deserted. Salem Church: Captain C. R. McAlpine and lieutenant C. W. Murdaugh. Gettysburg: private Elvin K. Casey. Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg: Captain Charles R. McAlpine, Elvin K. Casey, Wm. Mason, Edward King, John D. White, and Julius Ward. Wilderness: Captain Charles R. McAlpine, lieutenant John Hobday, and private Elvin K. Casey. Shady Grove: Private Charles N. Collins. Spotsylvania C. H.: Captain Charles R. McAlpine, lieutenant John Hobday, privates Charles N. Collins, Albert Powell, and John D. White. Wilcox Farm: Captain C. R. McAlpine, lieutenant John Hobday, privates Charles N. Collins, John C. Miller, and Richard White. Wounded. Salem Church: Lieutenant C. W. Murdaugh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of King William artillery. (search)
d; John M. Davis, killed at Bloody Angle; Wm. A. Davis, Jas. N. Eubank, Wm. M. Ellett, dead; John D. Edwards, Obediah Ellett, John W. Griffin, killed at Bloody Angle; F. Guthrow, H. E. Grubbs, John W. Gill, dead; John Hay, Robert Harper, dead; Richard Hilliard, dead; Jas. Hilliard, dead; Alex. C. Hilliard, dead; Richard Heath, Richard Hendrick, dead; Wm. Heath, Isaac A. Hughes, dead; Philip A. Fontaine, dead; Thos. S. Jones, killed at Seven Pines; Robert B. Johnson, killed at Seven Pines; Edward King, Mordecai A. Kelley, killed at Gettysburg; Festus King, Miles C. King, Lucian M. King, Egbert E. Lipscomb, dead; Bernard A. Lipscomb, Robert H. Lipscomb, Landon B. Lipscomb, James T. Lipscomb, dead; Richard Landrum, dead; Benjamin A. Littlepage, William Littlepage, William Luckhard, killed at Seven Pines; James Martin, dead; James R. Madison, Charles J. Madison, dead; George B. Morrison, dead; Andrew J. Moore, George Lee Munyon, dead; James D. Moore, William Madison, dead; Robert E. Mitch
gan. Adjutant.--Wm. R. Todd. Quartermaster.--Jas. W. Archer. Paymaster.--John H. Ellerson. Surgeon.--Dr. P. Trent. Surgeon's Mate--Dr. A. H. Snead. Quartermaster's Sergeant.--S. B. Jacobs. Cavalry.--Captain — J. G. Cabell. 1st Lieutenant--O. A. Crenshaw. 2d Lieut.--R. B. Kennon. Captains of the Line.--John F. Stagg, P. E. Dupuy, R. J. Denny, Stephen E. Morgan, James R. Chamberlain, Wm. J. Epps, D. W. Saunders. Lieutenants of the Line — S. S. Nicholas, Wm. R. Todd, Edward King, Jos. J. White, M. M. Lipscomb, F. B. Law, Adolphus Gary, W. P. Gilman, First Lieutenants. Wm. F. Atkinson, Robert P. Southall, A. B. Seay, C. D. McIndoe, A. A. Lorentz, Samuel H. Boykin, Second Lieutenants. Let the officers carry out their intention of drilling and preparing themselves to fill their posts creditably — let them, by falling into line and shouldering their muskets, learn to obey, and they will then have very little trouble in commanding, when required to do so. The mer<
Novel performance. --The "Infant Drum Corps," to which brief allusion was made yesterday, is chiefly composed of the children of Mr. Edward King, of this city, and no performance could be more wonderful, considering their youth, than that given under the direction of their instructor, Mr. Thomas Pulling, on Monday evening last, at the Theatre. They kept perfect time to the strains of Major Heffernan's life in the Marseillaise, Dixie, and other popular airs. The first drummer is Master Eening last, at the Theatre. They kept perfect time to the strains of Major Heffernan's life in the Marseillaise, Dixie, and other popular airs. The first drummer is Master Edw. King, three and a half years of age; second, Master Charlie King, 5 years; third, Miss Maud King, six and a half years; fourth, Miss Christiana King, eight and a half years; bass drummer, Master Pulling, 6 years. The corps was dressed in beautiful Zouave costume, and presented a novel as well as attractive appearance.
Judge Lyons's Court. --Robert S. Forde, charged with the murder of Robert E. Dixon, was arraigned for trail before Judge Lyons on Saturday, but, in consequence of inability to procure witnesses and jurors, the case was continued till the next term. In the matter of Edward King, claiming exemption from military service under a writ of habeas corpus, the Judge decided adversely to the petitioner, and he was thereupon remanded back to the custody of Captain William R. Drinkard, commandant of a company in Colonel Danforth's regiment. The habeas corpus ease of Horace E. Hayden was postponed till this morning.