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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George A. King or search for George A. King in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ms had first appropriated that number, it was changed to the Ninth. It was recruited by Col. Thomas H. Hunt, of Louisville, after the occupation of Louisville by the Federals, and went into service with a temporary organization, which was not completed until some time afterward. Its officers became Thomas H. Hunt, colonel; J. W. Caldwell, lieutenant-colonel; J. C. Wickliffe, major; Henry W. Gray, A. Q. M. The captains were, John W. Caldwell, J. C. Wickliffe, William Mitchell, Ben Desha, Geo. A. King, James T. Morehead, Chris Bosche and J. R. Bright. The Sixth, Lewis' regiment, was raised by Col. Jos. H. Lewis, of Glasgow, Ky., under similar circumstances to the foregoing, at Cave City, and organized as follows: Joseph H. Lewis, colonel; Martin H. Cofer, of Elizabethtown, lieutenant-colonel; Thomas H. Hays, of Hardin county, major; David C. Walker, A. Q. M.; John F. Davis, A. C. S.; R. S. Stevenson, surgeon, and H. H. Kavanagh, Jr., chaplain. The captains were, C. B. McClaskey, Ge
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ly inspired them by his words and example. Having his horse shot under him on Sunday, he entered the ranks of a Kentucky regiment on Monday and fell mortally wounded toward the close of the day. Not his State alone, but the whole Confederacy, has sustained a great loss in the death of this brave, upright and able man. In the conflicts of this day, continues Colonel Trabue, Lieut.-Col. Robert A. Johnston, after exemplary conduct, was wounded, Capt. William Mitchell was killed, and Capt. George A. King and Lieutenants Gillum, Harding and Schaub were wounded; all of the Fifth Kentucky. In the Sixth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Cofer, a cool, brave and efficient officer, was wounded; Capt. W. W. Bagby and Lieut. M. E. Aull were mortally wounded; Capts. D. E. McKendree and John G. Hudson were likewise wounded, as were also Lieuts. L. M. Tucker and Charles Dawson, the last named of whom was taken prisoner. Late in the evening of this second day, General Breckinridge, with the Kentucky
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
y the cavalry of General Marshall and Col. John H. Morgan, but the nature of the country not being favorable for cavalry operations, their resistance availed but little beyond preventing his movement westward, had he so designed. On September 27th a portion of Morgan's cavalry under Col. Basil W. Duke, aiming to cross the Ohio at Augusta for a demonstration against Cincinnati, had a severe engagement in the streets of that town with the home guards, who fired from the houses, causing a loss of twenty per cent of his force, with a much heavier loss to the enemy. Among his killed were Capts. Samuel D. Morgan (a cousin of Col. John H. Morgan), Allen and Kennett, and Lieuts. Greenbury Roberts, George White, Rogers, King and William Courtland Prentice, son of George D. Prentice, editor of the Louisville Journal. This was the only engagement which occurred on the Ohio during the campaign, although previously Col. R. M. Gano, of Morgan's cavalry, had captured Maysville without a fight.