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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for H. L. P. King or search for H. L. P. King in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
elow were not visible. As I was anxiously inquiring for some news from the pickets, since the point of attack had not yet been developed, my aide-de-camp, Captain H. L. P. King, volunteered to go to the river and collect information by personal observation, and I consented to his going, but did not send him. He rode off, and in abtore a leaf from my memorandum-book and wrote to General Cobb, General: Hold your position, with no fear of your flank, it will be protected, and handing it to Captain King, my aide-de-camp, told him to carry it to General Cobb, and to inform him that both ammunition and reenforcements were on the way. This was the last I saw of Captain King until we found this gallant officer's body, after the battle.--L. McL. General Kershaw at once moved his brigade as ordered, but while it was in motion a courier came from General Cobb and informed me that the general was desperately wounded. General Kershaw was directed to go at once and take command of the force
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
nd continuing, I directed Major-General Pickett to send me two of his brigades: one, Kemper's, was sent to General Ransom to be placed in some secure position to be ready in case it should be wanted. And again, I would also mention, as particularly distinguished in the engagement of the 13th, Brigadier-Generals Ransom, Kershaw, and Cooke (severely wounded). General McLaws was not upon the part of the field in the vicinity of Marye's and Willis's hills during the battle, but his aide, Captain King, was killed on the front slope of the hill near Marye's house. My own permanent command was a small division of two brigades of infantry,--my own, containing the 24th, 25th, 35th, and 49th; and Cooke's, the 15th, 27th, 46th, and 48th regiments,--all from North Carolina; and attached to my brigade was Branch's battery, and to Cooke's brigade the battery of Cooper. At the time the fog began to lift from the field, I was with Generals Lee and Longstreet on what has since been known as