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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
e Costa Rica.) Paraguay and Uruguay. William R. Finch, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Montevideo. Persia. Herbert W. Bowen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Teheran. Peru. Irving B. Dudley, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lima. Portugal. John N. Irwin, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lisbon. Russia. Charlemagne Tower, Ambassador Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, St. Petersburg. Siam. Hamilton King, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Bangkok. Spain. Bellamy Storer, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Madrid. Sweden and Norway. William W. Thomas, Jr., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Stockholm. Switzerland. John G. A. Leishman, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Berne. Turkey. Oscar S. Straus, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Constantinople. Venezuela. Francis B. Loomis, Envoy Extraordina
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eliot, John, 1754-1690 (search)
ong the twenty tribes within the English domain in Massachusetts in October, 1646. He acquired their language through an Indian servant in his family, made a grammar of it, and translated the Bible into the Indian tongue. It is claimed that Eliot was the first Protestant minister who preached to the Indians in their native tongue. An Indian town called Natick was erected on the Charles River for the praying Indians in 1657, and the first Indian church was established there in 1660. During King John Eliot. Philip's War Eliot's efforts in behalf of the praying Indians saved them from destruction by the white people. He travelled extensively, visited many tribes, planted several churches, and once preached before King Philip, who treated him with disdain. He persuaded many to adopt the customs of civilized life, and lived to see twenty-four of them become preachers of the Gospel to their own tribes. His influence among the Indians was unbounded, and his generosity in helping t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federal convention, the. (search)
Congress; and among the whole number there were only twelve who had not at some time sat in that body. The officers of the Revolution were represented by Washington, Mifflin, Hamilton, and C. C. Pinckney. Of the members who had taken conspicuous posts since the Declaration of Independence, the most prominent were Hamilton, Madison, and Edmund Randolph. then the successor of Patrick Henry as governor of Virginia. The members who took the leading part in the debates were Gerry, Gorham, and King, of Massachusetts; Johnson, Sherman, and Ellsworth, of Connecticut; Hamilton and Lansing, of New York; Paterson, of New Jersey; Wilson, Gouverneur Morris, and Franklin, of Pennsylvania; Dickinson, of Delaware: Martin, of Maryland; Williamson, of North Carolina; and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Charles Pinckney, of South Carolina. Rhode Island refused to elect delegates to the convention. The following is a full list of the members of the national convention: From New Hampshire—John Lang
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King, Hamilton 1852- (search)
King, Hamilton 1852- Diplomatist; born in St. Johns, Newfoundland, June 4, 1852; graduated at Olivet College, Mich., in 1878; appointed United States minister resident and consul-general to Siam, in January, 1898. He is the author of Outlines of United States history, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
army under General Bragg, Sept. 17; again occupied by the Federals......Sept. 21, 1862 Confederate State government organized at Frankfort, with Richard Hawes, of Bourbon, as governor, and four hours later leaves Frankfort, never to return......Oct. 4, 1862 Battle of Perryville fought on Chaplin Hills in Boyle county......Oct. 8, 1862 Nine Confederate soldiers captured and hanged in Rockcastle county in retaliation for the hanging in Bell county, by some Confederate soldiers, of Capt. H. King and fifteen others as bushwackers......Nov. 6, 1862 Colonel Cluke's Confederate cavalry take Mount Sterling......March 21, 1863 Battle of Dutton Hill, Pulaski county: Confederates retreat after five hours engagement......March 30. 1863 Desperate engagement at Tebb's bend of Green River, Taylor county. Two hundred of 25th Michigan Infantry, under Colonel Moore, in a strong natural fortification, are attacked by 600 of Morgan's men. When summoned to surrender, Colonel Moore declin