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tion of the following officers: Captain M. H. Wigg, A. C. S., when the flag staff was shot away, promptly mounted a transom and placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon it. Captain G. A. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King, and First-Lieutenant D G. Calhoun, were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Lieutenant Williams, Ordnance Officer, is also favorably mentioned. To Captains William Greene and B. G. Pincked to his post after getting his wound dressed. When the flag was struck down, Captain W. H. Wigg, A. C. S., promptly placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon a traverse. Captain W. H. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King and First Lieutenant D. G. Calhoun were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Major T. M. Baker, First South Carolina infantry, was wherever his services would be most useful. The Ordnance Of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.17 (search)
tain Sitgreaves, give me every reason to believe that the garrisons of Batteries Bee and Beauregard acquitted themselves equally well, and are equally entitled to the thanks of their commander and their country. Colonel Butler makes honorable mention of the following officers: Captain W. H. Wigg, A. C. S., when the flag-staff was shot away, promptly mounted a traverse and placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon it. Captain G. A. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King, and First Lieutenant Duff G. Calhoun, were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous places. Lieutenant W----, ordnance officer, is also favorably mentioned. I have the honor to transmit herewith a statement, in tabular form, showing the expenditure of ammunition by Fort Moultrie and the batteries during the action. To Captains W. S. Greene and B. G. Pinckney, of my staff, and First Lieutenant A. H. Lucas, my Aid-de-Camp, I am indebted for valuab
te Lusby, Company F, 1st South Carolina Infantry, causing his death in a few minutes. This was the only casualty of any importance. One gunner, Private Harrison, Company G, lost a finger by some inadvertence in running a gun into battery, but returned to his post after getting his wound dressed. When the flag was struck down Captain W. H. Wigg, A. C. S., promptly placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon a traverse. Captain W. H. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King and First-Lieutenant D. G. Calhoun were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Major T. M. Baker, 1st South Carolina Infantry, was wherever his services would be most useful. The ordnance officer, Second-Lieutenant Thomas Williams, was at his post at the magazine. Much credit is due to him for the good condition of the gun-carriages and the ordnance stores. I have already submitted a report of the amount of ammunition expended. The gu
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
soned and commanded by the following troops and officers: Fort Moultrie was garrisoned by a detachment of the First South Carolina regular infantry, drilled as artillery, and commanded by Col. William Butler, Maj. T. M. Baker second in command. The guns engaged were manned by Company A, Capt. T. A. Huguenin; Company E, Capt R. Press. Smith; Company F, Capt. B. S. Burnet; Company G, First Lieut. E. A. Erwin, and the mortars, Company K, Capt. C. H. Rivers. Staff: Capt. W. H. Wigg, Lieut. Mitchell King, Capt. G. A. Wardlaw, Lieut. Thomas Williams. Battery Bee was garrisoned by another detachment of the First South Carolina, and commanded by Lieut.-Col. J. C. Simkins. The guns were fought by Company C, Capt. Robert De Treville; Company H, Capt. Warren Adams, and Company I, Capt W. T. Tatom. Battery Beauregard was commanded by Capt J. A. Sitgreaves, with Company K, First artillery, Lieut. W. E. Erwin commanding, and Company B, First infantry, Capt. J. H. Warley commanding. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
in St. Michael's alley, Charleston. There is no doubt that Mr. Benjamin lived in Charleston, and went to school in this city. He told Mr. Levin that such was the case. Mr. B. C. Hard, of Williamston, S. C., who is still living, says that he was in Judah's class; that Judah was a very bright pupil, and quoted Shakespeare while playing marbles; that his teacher was Robert Southworth. Among his classmates, or school-fellows, were N. Russell Middleton, T. Leger Hutchinson, W. J. Hard, Mitchell King,——Wilson, B. C. Hard, Stephen Thomas and others—all for many years residents of this city. The Hebrew Orphan Society paid for his schooling. The store in which his father did business was situated in King street, near Clifford street, and his aunt, Mrs. Wright, as we were told yesterday upon good authority, also did business in this city. Probably when she moved to Fayetteville, in 1825, she took her nephew and niece with her. If further evidence were needed to prove that the Benja<
Judge Mitchell King of Charleston, S. C., died at Flat Rock, N. C., on the 13th inst.