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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert D. King or search for Robert D. King in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
pionage surrounded him all the time. The Sea King was a composite built vessel. That is, had iroira and get there sufficiently ahead of the Sea King to enable her to coal up. The Laurel arrived ateady for moving, upon the appearance of the Sea King. The general cargo of the Laurel consisted, ascrew. On the early morn of October 18, the Sea King arrived off Funchal, Madeira, and running in sited island not far from Madeira. There the Sea King anchored and her consort was secured alongside.d of the Laurel to the deck and hold of the Sea King was made, on October 19. Her officers were: re the officers who were transferred to the Sea King, all except myself and two engineers who joined from the Sea King, went out on the Laurel. Captain Waddell read his commission and addressed botes, were transferred from the Laurel to the Sea King. All was confusion and chaos. Everything had d left London thirteen months before as the Sea King , and had, as a Confederate cruiser, defied pur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
remain upon the scout until they had found out something definite about his movements, in whatever direction. Another order, received on the same day, directed that part of the regiment should operate with General John H. Morgan in one of his scouting forays in the mountains. On September 15 four companies of the 11th were sent into the Fox or Sugar Hill Country, in Garrard County, to hunt up, disperse or capture a little army of home guards and bushwhackers under the command of a man named King, who was giving a great deal of trouble in that direction. On the same day Lieutenant J. L. Wheeler was assigned to the command of Winchester and Clark County with his company (C) and directed to suppress all bushwhacking and break up all communications with the enemy, and to take away the arms of the Winchester home guards and parole the men. It was in such arduous and perilous work as scouting, fighting bushwhackers, etc., that the young regiment of raw recruits received its baptism of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
ns, McGowan Cooper, John Collins, Dr. Cummins, Wm. Dixon (or Dickson), Thomas Eads, Wm. Eads, James Freeman, died in Camp Douglas, February 25, 1864, of smallpox; John Glover, David N. Gordon, Ezekiel Hampton, Jesse Hampton, died in Camp Douglas, December 19, 1864, of smallpox; Joseph Hampton, wounded November 17, and died November 30, 1862; W. L. Haggard, Edward Haggard (Hunker), James P. Haggard, Sanford Haggard,——Haybrook, John Henry Jackson, promoted to sergeant major; James Johnson, Robt. D. King, Jeff C. King, James Kelley, wounded and prisoner at Hartsville, Tenn., December 9, 1862, lost leg; Wm. C. Kearney, J. Braxton Lyle, Joseph C. Lyle, James Henry Mullins, died in Camp Douglas, September 18, 1864, heart disease; Henry S. Meredith, James Oliver, died in Camp Douglas, November 17, 1864, chronic diarrhoea; Minor Perkins, Colby Pardo, John Pardo, died in Camp Douglas, August 26, 1864, dysentery; Wm. J. Quisenberry, Elkanah Ragland, Nathanial Ragland, died in Tennessee, of brai