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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxiv. (search)
one can convey in words, of something which, having been once seen, must remain a living picture in the memory forever. I tried to picture the solemn hush that lay like a pall on the spirit of the people while the grand procession wound its mournful length through the streets of the city out on that tearstained road to the gate of the cemetery, where the body passed beneath the prophetic words of California's most eloquent soul, Hither in future ages they shall bring, etc. When I spoke of Starr King, I saw how strong a chord I had touched in the great appreciative heart I addressed; and giving a weak dilution of that wondrous draught of soul-lit eloquence, that funeral hymn uttered by the priest of God over the sacred ashes of the advocate and soldier of liberty, whose thrilling threnody seems yet to linger in the sighing wind that waves the grass upon the soil made sacred by the treasure it received that day, I felt strangely impressed as to the power and grandeur of that mind, whos
ne old sea-captain used to tell her wonderful stories upon which she dreamed at night, and the sea-serpent was her familiar demon. Not infrequently I heard people in the street designate me as little Maggie's mother. We met in Portland the Rev. Starr King and the Rev. Mr. Stebbins, two great pulpit orators. Mr. Starr King boarded at the same house with us, and his nature and mind combined seemed to me to be a heavenly lyre that was capable of sounding any note in the gamut of joy or sympatMr. Starr King boarded at the same house with us, and his nature and mind combined seemed to me to be a heavenly lyre that was capable of sounding any note in the gamut of joy or sympathy. His eloquence was wondrous, and his cordial grace commended it to us. Mr. Stebbins was also personally most agreeable to Mr. Davis. They had several long talks upon doctrinal points, and once at a dinner, when the necessity of a formulated creed was urged by my husband, Mr. Stebbins argued against it, and said, The creed I set before my congregation is one-third democracy and two-thirds pluck. Mr. Davis used often afterward to cite this speech of a great and good man to show how needful
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
s memory die. But amongst all the floral offerings which deck his sylvan grave, one at least shall be laid there by the gentle hand of woman:—and whose fingers could better weave the chaplet than Grace Greenwood's? With the memory of my great friend (can it be that he is already only a memory?) come certain further off, pale and uncertain presences—the friends who were about him when I knew him first—Hawthorne, with his noble, sensitive face, his deep-set, furtive, melancholy eyes; Starr King, radiant with genius and princely in his perfect humanity; that beautiful wife of his poet-friend, she whose sweet, sad voice was prophetic of her martyr-like fate; that scholarly brother, so like him in person, in voice, in love of books and art; and that illustrious scientist, beloved and revered alike upon two hemispheres, that sweet, strong, childlike and grand human soul we knew as Louis Agassiz. These and many more choice spirits whose lives have mingled with or touched on his, come<
s memory die. But amongst all the floral offerings which deck his sylvan grave, one at least shall be laid there by the gentle hand of woman:—and whose fingers could better weave the chaplet than Grace Greenwood's? With the memory of my great friend (can it be that he is already only a memory?) come certain further off, pale and uncertain presences—the friends who were about him when I knew him first—Hawthorne, with his noble, sensitive face, his deep-set, furtive, melancholy eyes; Starr King, radiant with genius and princely in his perfect humanity; that beautiful wife of his poet-friend, she whose sweet, sad voice was prophetic of her martyr-like fate; that scholarly brother, so like him in person, in voice, in love of books and art; and that illustrious scientist, beloved and revered alike upon two hemispheres, that sweet, strong, childlike and grand human soul we knew as Louis Agassiz. These and many more choice spirits whose lives have mingled with or touched on his, come<
. Irwin Russell, Joel Chandler Harris, and Thomas Nelson Page portrayed in verse and prose the humorous, pathetic, unique traits of the Southern negro, a type hitherto chiefly sketched in caricature or by strangers. Page, Hopkinson Smith, Grace King, and a score of other artists began to draw affectionate pictures of the vanished Southern mansion of plantation days, when all the women were beautiful and all the men were brave, when the very horses were more spirited and the dogs lazier and ththat others are outgrowing their borders. There is one plant in our own garden, however, whose flourishing state will be denied by nobodynamely, that kind of nature-writing identified with Thoreau and practised by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Starr King, John Burroughs, John Muir, Clarence King, Bradford Torrey, Theodore Roosevelt, William J. Long, Thompson-Seton, Stewart Edward White, and many others. Their books represent, Professor Canby Back to Nature, by H. S. Canby, Yale review, Jul
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
n the Unitarian Church. Service in our schools seems to have been a good preparation for a wider life of usefulness and prominence. Many pupils must have been stimulated and greatly influenced for good by such earnest, fine young spirits as Starr King and his predecessors in office. The most distinguished guests within our borders have been two of world-wide fame, Washington (1789) and Lafayette (1824). The magnet that drew them was John Brooks, their comrade-in-arms. President James Mvolent; as a Parent, tender and affectionate; a good Neighbor, and very industrious in his Calling. He lived beloved, and died lamented, and made a hopeful Change. When he was about 18 years of age he enlisted a volunteer into the service of his King and Country in the Expedition against Cape-Britain under the command of Lt. General Pepperrell, in the year 174ZZZ—where he signalized his Courage in a remarkable Manner at the Island Battery, when the unsuccessful Attempt was made by a Detachment