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The Daily Dispatch: April 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 10, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The spy, King. --The man, calling himself Sterling King, who was arrested in Abingdon, Va., Sunday week, and sent to Gen. Longstreet's headquarters for trial, where he was tried but not convicted for want of evidence, turns out, it seems, to be a spy of the most dangerous kind, after all. He had left his baggage in Smyth county, which, on examination, was found to contain ample evidences of his guilt, in shape of a commission to recruit in the Federal service, and authority as a wagon mastSterling King, who was arrested in Abingdon, Va., Sunday week, and sent to Gen. Longstreet's headquarters for trial, where he was tried but not convicted for want of evidence, turns out, it seems, to be a spy of the most dangerous kind, after all. He had left his baggage in Smyth county, which, on examination, was found to contain ample evidences of his guilt, in shape of a commission to recruit in the Federal service, and authority as a wagon master to convoy Yankee teams to Cumberland Gap. He is still in custody, and will be likely to "go up."
Arrested as spies. --The evening trains which arrived in this city on Thursday night brought down two men, charged with being spies, who were committed to Castle Thunder. Their names are Dr. H. P. Ritter, a citizen of Edenton, North Carolina, who was forwarded, under escort of a guard, by Colonel P. C. Gaillard, provost marshal of Weldon, and Sterling King, an Englishman, sent here from Abingdon. The circumstances which led to their arrest have not been made known.