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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 4: a world outside of science (search)
ared through their absences. It would be easy to multiply testimonies from high scientific authority to this limitation and narrowing of the purely scientific mind. One such recent testimony may be found in an important report of the head of the chemical department of Harvard University, Prof. Josiah P. Cooke; and another in that very remarkable paper in the Forum entitled The education of the future, by a man who singularly combines within himself the scientific and literary gifts-Clarence King, formerly Director of the United States Geological Survey. After weighing more skilfully than I have ever seen it done elsewhere the strength and weakness of the literary or classical training of the past, he thus deals with the other side: With all its novel powers and practical sense, I am obliged to admit that the purely scientific brain is miserably mechanical; it seems to have become a splendid sort of self-directed machine, an incredible automaton, grinding on with its analyses or con
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 6: Lowell's closing years in Cambridge (search)
ct to do about it? Lowell did not, therefore, inherit recluse qualities. As a school-boy he was the gayest of the gay. In college he was the wit of his class; and my college diary records him as coming as a senior into our freshman debating club and keeping us supplied with amusement for the whole evening. It is enough to say that he was secretary of the Hasty Pudding Club — the reverse of a recluse position-and kept its records in verse. After leaving college he and Maria White were the King and Queen of what was probably the most brilliant circle of young people — the Brother and sister club-ever brought together in the neighborhood of Boston. After his marriage, too, Elmwood became the scene of a modest but delightful hospitality; for Mrs. Lowell had hosts of friends and loved to meet them. Eminent strangers were entertained there; Ole Bull, for instance, on his first arrival. Then followed by degrees the deaths of his older children, and the illness and death of his wife;
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 24: on the natural disapproval of wealth (search)
roval of wealth, especially on the part of those who have never possessed it. It is natural also that this should be a sliding scale, and that each person should regard the next largest tax-payer as too rich. Thirty years ago, at the sea-side resort called Pigeon Cove, or Cape Ann, there was a village wit known habitually as Old Knowlton, a retired fisherman, who delighted to corner in argument a set of eminent clergymen who then resorted there, as Dr. Chapin, Dr. Gannett, Dr. Bartol, Thomas Starr King, and others. He liked to swear before them, to ask hard questions out of the Old Testament, and to call them familiarly by their last names. One day he was much startled, on asking about Dr. Gannett's salary, to hear that it was $3000, which would not now be regarded as a large sum, but seemed to him enormous. Why, Gannett, said the licensed veteran, what can a minister do with so much money? You can't know how to manage it! Gannett, you ought to have a guardeen! No doubt we a
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ornia, to learn the present condition of Col. Baker's grave; and in reply, I received the following interesting information from Mr. Robert J. Stevens, son-in-law of Col. Baker: Washington, D. C., March 31st, 1874. my Dear Sir,—I hasten to reply to your note of this morning, enclosing letter of Mr. C. Edwards Lester, inquiring about Baker monument. The plans for such monument, very magnificent, and studiously elaborated—the work of Horatio Stone—were sent by Rev. H. W. Bellows to Thos. Starr King at San Francisco (1862), and doubtless would have been in marble ere this, had it not been for his untimely death. They are now deposited with the Society of California Pioneers, in their new building, subject to my order. The grave of Baker (at Lone Mountain) is principally marked by the towering monument of Broderick a few yards distant. It is in the midst of a considerable enclosure, walled with concrete handsomely coped with fine stone; it has above it a slab or tablet on colum<
ornia, to learn the present condition of Col. Baker's grave; and in reply, I received the following interesting information from Mr. Robert J. Stevens, son-in-law of Col. Baker: Washington, D. C., March 31st, 1874. my Dear Sir,—I hasten to reply to your note of this morning, enclosing letter of Mr. C. Edwards Lester, inquiring about Baker monument. The plans for such monument, very magnificent, and studiously elaborated—the work of Horatio Stone—were sent by Rev. H. W. Bellows to Thos. Starr King at San Francisco (1862), and doubtless would have been in marble ere this, had it not been for his untimely death. They are now deposited with the Society of California Pioneers, in their new building, subject to my order. The grave of Baker (at Lone Mountain) is principally marked by the towering monument of Broderick a few yards distant. It is in the midst of a considerable enclosure, walled with concrete handsomely coped with fine stone; it has above it a slab or tablet on colum<
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
cated to the late Edwin Percy Whipple, to whom more than to any other person I was indebted for public recognition as one worthy of a place in American literature, at a time when it required a great degree of courage to urge such a claim for a proscribed abolitionist. Although younger than I, he had gained the reputation of a brilliant essayist, and was regarded as the highest American authority in criticism. His wit and wisdom enlivened a small literary circle of young men including Thomas Starr King, the eloquent preacher, and Daniel N. Haskell of the Daily Tracnscrintzzz, who gathered about our common friend James T. Fields at the Old Corner Bookstore. The poem which gave title to the volume I inscribed to my friend and neighbor Harriet Prescott Spofford, whose poems have lent a new interest to our beautiful river-valley. from the green Amesbury hill which bears the name Of that half mythic ancestor of mine Who trod its slopes two hundred years ago, Down the long valley of th
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
The glory of his seventy years. When Peace brings Freedom in her train, Let happy lips his songs rehearse; His life is now his noblest strain, His manhood better than his verse! Thank God! his hand on Nature's keys Its cunning keeps at life's full span; But, dimmed and dwarfed, in times like these, The poet seems beside the man! So be it! let the garlands die, The singer's wreath, the painter's meed, Let our names perish, if thereby Our country may be saved and freed! 1864. Thomas Starr King. Published originally as a prelude to the posthumous volume of selections edited by Richard Frothingham. the great work laid upon his twoscore years Is done, and well done. If we drop our tears, Who loved him as few men were ever loved, We mourn no blighted hope nor broken plan With him whose life stands rounded and approved In the full growth and stature of a man. Mingle, O bells, along the Western slope, With your deep toll a sound of faith and hope! Wave cheerily still, O bann
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
Pictures. To Englishmen. The Watchers. The Waiting. The Battle Autumn of 1862. Astraea at the Capitol. 1863The Proclamation. The Answer. To Samuel E. Sewall and Harriet W. Sewall. A Memorial. Andrew Rykman's Prayer. The Countess. Barbara Frietchie. Anniversary Poem. Hymn sung at Christmas by the Scholars of St.Helena's Island, S. C. Mithridates at Chios. 1864The Vanishers. What the Birds said. The Brother of Mercy. The Wreck of Rivermouth. Bryant on his Birthday. Thomas Starr King. Hymn for the Opening of Thomas Starr King's House of Worship. Lines on leaving Appledore. 1865Revisited. To the Thirty-ninth Congress. The Changeling. The Grave by the Lake. Kallundborg Church. Hymn for the Celebration of Emancipation at Newburyport. Laus Deo. The Mantle of St. John de Matha. The Peace Autumn. The Eternal Goodness. 1866Snow-Bound. The Common Question. Our Master. Abraham Davenport. Lines on a Fly Leaf. The Maids of Attitash. The Dead Ship of Harpswe
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of Titles (search)
In the Old South, i. 371. Invocation, II. 235. Isabel, IV. 355. Isabella of Austria, IV. 351. Italy, III. 360. I was a Stranger, and ye took me in, IV. 204. John Underhill, i. 354. Jubilee Singers, The, III. 268. Judith at the Tent of Holofernes, IV. 342. June on the Merrimac, IV. 181. Kallundborg Church, IV. 265. Kansas Emigrants, The, III. 176. Kathleen, i. 120. Kenoza Lake, IV. 161. Khan's Devil, The, i. 378. King, Thomas Starr, IV. 114. King's Missive, The, i. 381. King Solomon and The Ants, i. 369. King Volmer and Elsie, i. 345. Kinsman, IV. 196. Knight of St. John, The, i. 62. Kossuth, IV. 72. Lady Franklin, IV. 327. Lakeside, The, II. 18. Lament, A, IV. 9. Landmarks, The, IV. 210. Larcom, Lucy, To, IV. 408. Larcom, Lucy, Letter to, IV. 405. Last Eve of Summer, The, IV. 314. Last Walk in Autumn, The, II. 37. Laurels, The, IV. 180. Laus I)eo, III. 254. Lay of Old Time, A, IV. 158.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2., The development of the public School of Medford. (search)
r Angier 1822Jan.-Feb. 1822Calvin Lincoln1820from Hingham 1823Jan.-Feb. 1823George W. Burnap1824from Merrimack 1827Jan.-June, 1827Jacob Gutterson 1827June-May, 1828William B. Duggan 1828May-Sept. 1832Amos P. Baker 1832Oct.-June, 1833Seth Pettee 1833June-May, 1834Thomas S. Harlow 1834May-April, 1835Alexander GreggHigh School established 1835 FromTo 1835May-Aug. 1838Benjamin F. Tweed 1838July-April, 1840James G. Foster 1840May-Nov. 1842Benjamin F. Gilman 1842Nov.-Aug. 1843Thomas Starr King 1843Aug.-Apr. 1846Aaron K. Hathaway High School in third School-house 1835-1844 1835May-Aug. 1835Charles Mason 835Aug.-Mch. 1836Luther Farrar 1836April-Feb. 1841Daniel H. Forbes 1841Mch.-April, 1844Isaac Ames 1844April-Sept. 1844M. T. Gardner The easterly section of the town, whose early ambitions for a school-house had been so completely buried in 1805, began to show a revival of courage. A petition dated Feb. 3, 1823, signed by Nathaniel Jaquith, Elisha L. Tainter, and
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