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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Final Chapter: the faithful but less conspicuous laborers. (search)
Cozzens, Mrs. E. W. Davis, Miss S. F. McCracken, Miss Anna M. Debenham, since deceased, Miss Susan Bell, Miss Charlotte Ledergerber, Mrs. S. C. Davis, Mrs. Hazard, Mrs. T. D. Edgar, Mrs. George Partridge, Miss E. A. Hart, since deceased, Mrs. H. A. Nelson, Mrs. F. A. Holden, Mrs. Hicks, Mrs. Baily, Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, Mrs. C. V. Barker, Miss Bettie Brodhead, Mrs. T. M. Post, Mrs. E. J. Page, Miss Jane Patrick, since deceased, Mrs. R. H. Stone, Mrs. C. P. Coolidge, Mrs. S. R. Ward, Mrs. Washington King, Mrs. Wyllys King, Miss Fales, since deceased. The following were among the noble women at Springfield, Ill., who were most devoted in their labors for the soldier in forwarding sanitary supplies, in visiting the hospitals in and near Springfield, in sustaining the Soldiers' Home in that city, and in aiding the families of soldiers. Mrs. Lucretia Jane Tilton, Miss Catharine Tilton, Mrs. Lucretia P. Wood, Mrs. P. C. Latham, Mrs. M. E. Halbert, Mrs. Zimmerman, Mrs. J. D. B. Salter,
Hernan and the Champion Belt. --His Challenge Accepted by Mace.--Jim Mace, who recently whipped the Staley bridge Infant, has replied to Heenan's challenge, and signifies his readiness to fight. He is ready to make a match for £200 to £600 per side, either before or after his coming fight with King. The matter, as far as the "American Champion" is concerned, is in the hands of his friend, Geo. Wiikes, and it is said by him that "he expects soon to be able to announce Heenan's aspent to the proposition of Mace, and the arrangement of the preliminaries." Heenan challenged any man in England for £2,000 ($10,000,) but Mace does not seem willing to accept so large a stake, and accuses Heenan of bouncing Heenan wants his expenses paid, if he fights in England, or will pay Mace's if comes to America. Mace says: "It is a rale of the English prize ring that the Champion Belt cannot be fought for out of the United Kingdom." The match is in a fair way of being made up, and it is b
Synner death. --Hon. Washington King is Mayor of St. Louis, died suddenly of apoplexy in that city on the 27th instant. Mr. King was elected Mayor by the Americans of that city, and was very popular there.--Only two hours before his death he was perfectly well. Synner death. --Hon. Washington King is Mayor of St. Louis, died suddenly of apoplexy in that city on the 27th instant. Mr. King was elected Mayor by the Americans of that city, and was very popular there.--Only two hours before his death he was perfectly well.
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], What the North Thiske of the war thus far. (search)
n some unknown person in the street, proved that the arm was not loaded; that he was "sky-larking" and corned at the time. Discharged with an admonition. Jas. J. Macklin, arrested for threats to set fire to Franklin Hall, was discharged, proving to have been drunk at the time, and generally a trifling fellow. He pretended on the night of his arrest to have belonged to the New Market Club in Baltimore, when the truth was he belonged to Clarksville, Va., and had never seen the Monumental city in his life. Coley, slave of P. H. Aylett, hired to Washington King, was ordered 15 lashes for stoning the residence of Adolphus Tyree, and breaking thirty-two window panes attached thereto. Cyrus Winston, slave of John Thacker, was remanded for trial before the Hustings Court, for feloniously cutting Wm. Burnett's hand, in the Second Market, while the latter had him in custody for stealing a piece of meat from John Jaiser. He was ordered 25 lashes for the latter offence.