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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
am C. OatesNov. 1894 to Nov. 1896 Joseph F. JohnstonNov. 1896 to Nov. 1898 Joseph F. JohnstonNov. 1898 to Nov. 1900 W. J. SamfordNov. 1900 to Nov. 1902 United States senators from the State of Alabama. Names.No. of Congress.Date. William R. King16th to 28th1819 to 1844 John W. Walker16th to 17th1819 to 1822 William Kelley17th to 19th1823 to 1825 Henry Chambers19th1825 to 1826 Israel Pickens19th to 20th1826 John McKinley19th to 22d1826 to 1831 Gabriel Moore22d to 25th1831 to 1837 Clement C. Clay25th to 27th1837 to 1841 Arthur P. Bagby27th to 30th1841 to 1848 Dixon H. Lewis28th to 30th1844 to 1848 William R. King30th to 32d1848 to 1852 Benj. Fitzpartrick30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Jeremiah Clemens31st to 33d1849 to 1853 Clement C. Clay. Jr33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. George E. Spencer40th to 46th1868 to 1879 Williard Warner40th to 42d1868 to 1871 George Goldthwaite42d to 45th1872 to 1877 John T. Morgan45th to----1877 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King, William Rufus 1786- (search)
King, William Rufus 1786- Statesman; born in Sampson county, N. C., April 7, 1786; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1803; practised law, and served in the legislature of his State. He was a member of Congress (1811-16), and for two years (1816-18) was secretary of legation at Naples. On his return he became a cotton-planter in Alabama, and was United States Senator from 1819 to 1844, and from 1847 to 1853, being minister to France during 1844-46. Mr. King was elected Vicef his State. He was a member of Congress (1811-16), and for two years (1816-18) was secretary of legation at Naples. On his return he became a cotton-planter in Alabama, and was United States Senator from 1819 to 1844, and from 1847 to 1853, being minister to France during 1844-46. Mr. King was elected Vice-President of the United States in 1852, but died (in Cahawba, Ala., April 18, 1853) a few weeks after taking the oath of office at Havana, a privilege accorded by a special act of Congress.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King's daughters, (search)
King's daughters, A religious organization founded in New York City, Jan. 18, 1886. It is inter-denominational, and purposes to do whatever is possible through women for the cause of humanity. Any woman or girl who will give small but regular contributions to Christian work is eligible to membership. The society's ranks are recruited mostly by correspondence, and it has a large membership in the United States and Europe.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King's daughters and Sons, international order of the (search)
King's daughters and Sons, international order of the See international order of the King's daughters and Sons.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King's province. (search)
King's province. In 1683 a new royal commission was named for the settlement of boundary disputes between Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Plymouth. Its members being principally selected from Massachusetts and Connecticut, Rhode Island objected to them as not disinterested; and when they proceeded to hold a session within the disputed territory, the Rhode Island Assembly met near by and forbade them to hold court within the jurisdiction of the province. The commission adjourned to Boston, and reported to the King (1686) that the Narraganset country (the southwestern continental half of the present State of Rhode Island) belonged to Connecticut; this domain was called the King's Province for a while, but was under the jurisdiction of Joseph Dudley, the temporary royal governor of Massachusetts. He proceeded to organize there an independent government, and changed the names of the towns.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kossuth, Lajos (Louis) 1802- (search)
chamber accompanied by Senators Cass and Seward. General Shields introduced him. The Senate adjourned, and the members all paid their personal respects to the distinguished exile. He then visited the House of Representatives, where he was warmly received by the speaker and most of the members. Then he was introduced to each member personally, and presented to an immense crowd of ladies and gentlemen who had assembled. A congressional banquet was given him at the National Hotel, at which W. R. King, president of the Senate, presided, Kossuth and Speaker Boyd being on his right hand, and Secretary Webster on his left. On that occasion Kossuth delivered one of his most effective speeches. Mr. Webster concluded his remarks with the following sentiment : Hungarian independence, Hungarian control of her own destinies, and Hungary as a distinct nationality among the nations of Europe. After Kossuth's departure there were debates in Congress on propositions for the United States to lend
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
1.PaDem170 Henry ClayKyWhig1,299,068105T. FrelinghuysenN. J.Whig105 James G. BirneyN. Y.Lib62,300Thomas MorrisO.Lib 1848. Zachary Taylor For foot-note references see page 291.LaWhig1,360,101139,557163Millard Fillmore For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Whig163 Lewis CassMich.Dem1,220,544127William O. ButlerKyDem127 Martin Van BurenN. Y.F. Soil291,263Charles F. AdamsMass.F. Soil 1852. Franklin Pierce For foot-note references see page 291.N. H.Dem1,601,474220,896254William R. King For foot-note references see page 291.AlaDem254 Winfield ScottN. J.Whig1,380,57642William A. GrahamN. C.Whig42 John P. HaleN. H.F. D. (i)156,149George W. JulianInd.F. D. Daniel Webster (k)Mass.Whig1,670 1856. James Buchanan For foot-note references see page 291.PaDem1,838,169496,905174J. C. Breckinridge For foot-note references see page 291.KyDem174 John C. FremontCalRep1,341,264114William L. DaytonN. J.Rep114 Millard FillmoreN. Y.Amer874,5388A. J. DonelsonTennAmer8 186
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Slavery. (search)
the claimant. And the said court, commissioner, judge, or other person authorized by this act to grant certificates to claimants of fugitives, shall, upon the production of the record and other evidences aforesaid, grant to such claimant a certificate of his right to take any such person identified and proved to be owing service or labor as aforesaid, which certificate shall authorize such claimant to seize or arrest and transport such person to the State or territory from which he escaped: provided, that nothing herein contained shall be construed as requiring the production of a transcript of such record as evidence as aforesaid. But in its absence, the claim shall be heard and determined upon other satisfactory proofs, competent in law. Howell Cobb, Speaker of the House of Representatives. William R. King, President of the Senate pro tempore. Approved, Sept. 18, 1850. Millard Fillmore. For additional details of slavery and the slave-trade, see cognate titles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
d sixty-six......July 9, 1850 Vice-President Fillmore takes the oath of office as President......July 10, 1850 William R. King, of Alabama, president pro tem. of the Senate......July 11, 1850 Treaty between the United States and the Hawaiiare, was first presented and received 15 votes, and on the forty-ninth ballot he was nominated, receiving 282 votes. William R. King, of Alabama, nominated for Vice-President.] Whig National Presidential Convention meets at Baltimore......June 16nteenth administration—Democratic, March 4, 1853, to March 3, 1857. Franklin Pierce, New Hampshire, President. William R. King, Alabama, Vice-President. Oath of office is administered to the Vice-President-elect by United States Consul Sharketanzas, on the island of Cuba......March 24, 1853 [A special act of Congress authorized Mr. Sharkey to do this.] Wm. R. King, thirteenth Vice-President of the United States, dies at Cahawba, Ala., aged sixty-seven......April 18, 1853 Kane s
day of December, 1851; and, in the absence of John Davis, Gen. Lewis Cass rose, and said, I have been requested to present the credentials of Charles Sumner, a senator elect from the State of Massachusetts. The credentials having been read, William R. King of Alabama administered the oath of office. On the same day Henry Clay, after a brief speech, made his final retirement from that hall in which his eloquent voice had so many times been heard in the defence of constitutional liberty. In hime. Had I been less conscious of the rectitude of my course, I might have sunk under these words; but I persevered in my own way. As I delivered the part to which you refer, I remember well the intent looks of the Senate, and particularly of Mr. King [president pro tem of the senate]. It was already dinner-time, but all were silent and attentive; and Hale [John P. Hale, of N. H.] tells me that Mr. Underwood of Kentucky, by his side, was in tears. From many leading Southern men I have rece
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