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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 94 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Z. L. King or search for Z. L. King in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
s soon requested to relieve his left division (General Butterfield's) for a re-enforcement with my troops. I sent every regiment that I had out of line at once. General Thomas had already directed that General Stanley's should be relieved by General King's, but this could not be effected till after dark, owing to King's close proximity to the enemy. As soon as relieved, during the night, Stanley pushed his entire command to my right. June 23, in accordance with request of General Thomas, King's close proximity to the enemy. As soon as relieved, during the night, Stanley pushed his entire command to my right. June 23, in accordance with request of General Thomas, I tried an intrenched height in front of Generals Newton's and Stanley's position, it being doubted whether or not this was a portion of the enemy's main line. I opened upon it a concentrated artillery fire from as many guns as I could bring to bear, and immediately afterward advanced a strong skirmish line, which drove the enemy within his works, and developed a heavy artillery and musketry fire. By this operation I advanced our lines, particularly on the extreme right, to very close proximi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
back. This occurred three times, when, night having arrived, I directed the contest to stop. On the morning of the 21st Colonel Kirby was ordered to retake the hill for which he contended the day before. As General Wood's division moved forward at the same time, this was soon accomplished with slight loss. During the 22d the division remained in position excepting five regiments of Colonel Grose's brigade, which marched to the right to relieve part of Butterfield's division. At night General King's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieved us, and we in turn relieved Butterfield's division by daylight in the morning. We occupied the day strengthening our position, and about 5 p. m. formed a strong picket-line and charged that of the enemy, capturing about 40 of them. Shortly afterward the enemy made a counter-charge, and outflanking the skirmishers of Whitaker's brigade, forced them back. Our loss in the affair was about 60 men. During the 24th, 25th, and 26th our lines were
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
ng on in our front. After moving forward with the brigade to an open field, we formed in line of battle in the second line. One hour later, with the Twenty-first Kentucky, the Thirty-fifth advanced. About the same time the enemy retreated from our front. Camped that night within one and a half miles of the Macon railroad. On the following morning, September 1, advanced along the railroad, destroying it as we went; came upon the enemy late in the evening going into position on the left of King's brigade. The regiment was under a heavy fire, which continued until dark. We had 2 men wounded on this occasion. The following morning moved after the retreating foe, passing through Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fall. While in this position the enemy shelled our lines with some effect. The regiment had 1 man wounded. The same evening the Thirty-fift
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
; my skirmish line, under Colonel Miller, Thirtysixth Illinois, was thrown out well to the left, to cover the movement, the Fourteenth Corps not having come up. Colonel Miller had severe skirmishing with the enemy, through the dense undergrowth; captured many of them. I came into position on the left of Stanley. June 20, remained in position; had a sharp artillery duel in the afternoon, Goodspeed's and Spencer's batteries silencing two of the enemy's batteries. Was relieved toward night by King's division, Fourteenth Corps. June 21, moved to the right, and relieved part of the Twentieth Corps. General Wood, on our left, having advanced, our lines were moved forward about 200 yards, and connected] with him. June 22, skirmish line was re-enforced, and, under command of Colonel Bradley, advanced, driving the enemy's skirmishers from their pits into the main line. The enemy's position behind a strong line of works was plainly determined by this advance. Our skirmish line lost very hea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 65 (search)
ined in this position until the 23d, when we moved in the direction of Dallas, crossing the Etowah at Gillem's Bridge and bivouacking near Stilesborough, and on the 24th moved to Burnt Hickory, and on the 25th to near Dallas, going into position on the morning of the 26th with considerable skirmishing, which continued until about 10 a. m. of the 27th, when the brigade was withdrawn and formed in front of the division. Each brigade being deployed in two lines with this formation, supported by King's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, it moved through a thick wood for about three miles in search of the enemy's right flank. Having found it at 2.30 p. m., we remained in position until 4.30 for the other troops forming the expedition to be made ready. This brigade, in two lines, was then pushed forward to attack the enemy, the other troops not moving. After skirmishing about 800 yards, the front line came upon and immediately engaged the enemy, when one of the most desperate engageme
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
s ordered to be held until orders for withdrawal should be given. Skirmishers were ordered to the front to guard against surprise. At 10 o'clock the order to withdraw was received; every effort was made to bring off the wounded previous to the movement. All of a sudden, the enemy sallied from his works and made an assault upon the line, which was promptly and vigorously repulsed. The brigade then withdrew in good order, undisturbed by the enemy, and fell back to the intrenched position of King's brigade, of the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. The brigade lost during the engagement heavily in officers and enlisted men. A list of the casualties accompanies this report. Officers and soldiers acted most gallantly, the regiments of the second line particularly, who advanced in admirable order over very difficult ground, and determinedly maintained their ground against vastly superior forces. Conspicuous for gallantry and deserving of special mention are Col. Charles F. Manders
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
ngaged in preparing for the use of artillery at two points on his front. He thinks he hears the hum and suppressed noises which usually attend the secret movement of large bodies of troops, and as a consequence anticipates an attack to-night or early to-morrow. In my opinion, assuming an intention on the part of the enemy to attack, Schofield's position on the hill (that lately occupied by Stoneman) is the true object.of their movement. That once firmly in their possession the positions of King and Carlin are at their mercy. Unless the arrangements for its defense have been improved since 6 o'clock this afternoon it will not be held against a strong attack. I have addressed a note to General Schofield on the subject, which goes out with this. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. Itinerary of the Fourteenth Army Corps, May 6-September 8. from monthly returns. The Corps was commanded by
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 92 (search)
7. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, August 7, 1864. General: The Fourteenth Corps gained decided advantage to-day. The charge of my old division, under King, against the enemy's works was a gallant affair; in fact, the operations of the entire corps are highly satisfactory. A portion of King's men were actually in theKing's men were actually in the enemy's works, but in consequence of the entanglements few men could reach them and not in sufficient force to hold them. The lines are advanced. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. We have lost not far from 500 men, while we have captured about 350 or 400 prisoners. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. [Major-General Schofield.] Addenda: report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during operations of August 11, 1864. Zzz R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
in action to turn over the command to Brigadier-General King: On the 3d of May, pursuant to insuld be found, I ordered my reserve brigade (General King's) across Mill Creek, to within close suppo in double line, Carlin's brigade on the right, King's on the left, and Scribner's in reserve (then ory but effective fire in reply to the enemy's. King's brigade, which lay considerably farther from luding many valuable officers. The loss in General King's brigade was comparatively light. On the r's brigade was thrown into line on the left of King to relieve Turchin's brigade. On Sunday his li Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the assault finally commenced, howeveis time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I cCook) was formed on the left of the Third, and King's brigade was formed in reserve with the artillo the right of Army of the Tennessee. August 4, King's brigade made a reconnaissance to the right an[3 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
or the night on the south side. May 25.-The brigade remained at this place during the day, while the train of the Twentieth Army Corps passed, and at 1 o'clock next morning, May 26, it marched on the Burnt Hickory road, through Burnt Hickory, to Brown's Mill, three miles from Dallas. May 27.-The command moved in two lines, supporting the Second and Third Brigades, to a point on Pumpkin Vine Creek near Pickett's Mills. At 11 p. m. the brigade was placed in two lines on the left of General King. Msay 28.-Early next morning the line was advanced about onequarter of a mile and the brigade was formed in single line extending from right to left along the ridge in front of Leverett's and Brand's houses. About 3 p. m. the First Wisconsin, (Third Brigade) was put in position on the right of the brigade, to complete the line to Pumpkin Vine Creek. Brisk skirmishing was kept up all day and night along the whole front. Capt. R. J. Waggener, assistant adjutant-general, was killed ab
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