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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Benjamin King or search for Benjamin King in all documents.

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brought a brigade of volunteers from New Orleans. The Louisiana commands assembled to fight at Shiloh were: The Eleventh was with Tennesseeans in the brigade of Col. R. M. Russell Colonel Marks was severely wounded while leading his men on the morning of the 6th, leaving Lieutenant-Colonel Barrow in command. The Fourth, Thirteenth (Maj. A. P. Avegno) and Nineteenth, with an Arkansas regiment, composed a brigade of Ruggles' division commanded by Col. R. L. Gibson. Major Avegno and Lieut. Benjamin King, Gibson's gallant aide-de-camp, were among the officers wounded. Ruggles' division was mainly Louisiana troops, the other brigades being Patton Anderson's and Preston Pond's. Anderson's brigade included the Seventeenth, Twentieth, Response battalion, and Hodgson's artillery. Colonel Jones, and Lieutenant-Colonel Boyd (Twentieth) were wounded; Major Clack had two horses shot under him. Col. Preston Pond, Sixteenth, commanded a brigade including the Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Crescent, an
ked us for an instant, but the officers rushed forward again, the men followed, and the enemy, panic-stricken, fled in the wildest disorder. . . . We continued to drive the enemy from every position for three-quarters of a mile until we had entered the woods, about 70 yards west of the Chattanooga road, where we halted. During the charge several hundred prisoners remained within their lines, but the Louisianians gave no heed to them. The position they stormed was held by the brigade of General King, whose dead and wounded marked his track to the rear. A battery was taken by the Thirteenth and Twentieth, but the gallantry of the whole brigade made it in fact a brigade honor. The brigade halted victoriously at night at the very point whence it had recoiled at midday. Among the officers, Col. Daniel Gober and Col. Leon Von Zinken were conspicuous for courage and skill. All the officers and men behaved with commendable gallantry. Maj. C. H. Moore, Capt. H. A. Kennedy, who command
utenants Foley and Pitman, Wheat's battalion, were killed at Cold Harbor, and Lieutenants Francis and McCauley, Sixth; Lieutenant Newport, Seventh; and Lieutenant LeBlanc, Eighth, were among the killed at Malvern Hill. The other Louisiana commands were with that part of the army that opposed the main body of McClellan's forces before Richmond, while Jackson, Longstreet, and the Hills crushed the Federal right wing beyond the Chickahominy. The first fight of the whole great campaign was at King's schoolhouse, June 25th, the enemy taking the aggressive against Wright's brigade on the Williamsburg road. Wright went to the front at once with the First Louisiana, Lieut.-Col. W. R. Shivers commanding, and the Twenty-second Georgia, and soon, according to Wright's report, these brave men were dashing through the woods, with loud cheers, driving the enemy through a field to another wooded covert. With a gallantry and impetuosity which has rarely been equaled, and certainly never excelled