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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 95 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 36 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 17 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 15 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 15 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Charles King or search for Charles King in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 9 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
the father to give his boy the college education he desired; so at fourteen, fresh from the common schools, Samuel entered as a clerk the banking house of Prime & King. While still a mere lad, an old friend of the family asked him what he meant to be when he came to man's estate. I mean to be one of the first bankers in the United States! replied Samuel. At the age of twenty-two he became a partner in the firm, which was thereafter known as Prime, Ward & King. In a memoir of our grandfather, the partner who survived him, Mr. Charles King, says:-- Money was the commodity in which Mr. Ward dealt, and if, as is hardly to be disputed, money be tMr. Charles King, says:-- Money was the commodity in which Mr. Ward dealt, and if, as is hardly to be disputed, money be the root of all evil, it is also, in hands that know how to use it worthily, the instrument of much good. There exist undoubtedly, in regard to the trade in money, and respecting those engaged in it, many and absurd prejudices, inherited in part from ancient error, and fomented and kept alive by the jealousies of ignorance and ind
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
We forget the name of another quaint personage, a retired sea-captain, who once gave a party to which she was allowed to go; but she remembered the party, and the unction with which the kindly host, rubbing his hands over the supper table, exclaimed: Now, ladies and gentlemen, help yourselves sang froidy! The roses and gooseberry bushes of the Newport garden once witnessed a serio-comic scene. There was another sea-captain, Glover by name, who had business connections with Prime, Ward & King, and who came to the house sometimes on business, sometimes for a friendly call. He was a worthy man of middle age and unromantic appearance; probably the eighteenyear-old Julia, dreamy and poetic, took no more notice of him than civility required; but he took notice of her, and one day asked her to walk out in the garden with him. Wondering much, she went. After some desultory remarks, the Captain drew a visiting-card from his pocket, wrote a few words upon it, and handed it to his young h
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
of measures for inducing and enabling the banks to resume at the earliest possible moment. The Late Samuel Ward, by Mr. Charles King. This was accomplished within the year. About the same time the Bank of England sent to Prime, Ward & King a loKing a loan of nearly five million dollars in gold. Mr. King says, This extraordinary mark of confidence, this well-earned tribute to the prudence and integrity of the house, Mr. Ward did not affect to undervalue, and confirming, as it did, the sagacity of hMr. King says, This extraordinary mark of confidence, this well-earned tribute to the prudence and integrity of the house, Mr. Ward did not affect to undervalue, and confirming, as it did, the sagacity of his own views, and the results which he had so confidently foretold, it was not lost upon the community in the midst of which he lived. Our mother never forgot the afternoon when Brother Sam came into her study on his return from Wall Street and crgoing up and down the office stairs all day long, carrying little wooden kegs of gold on their backs, marked Prime, Ward & King and filled with English gold! That English gold saved the honor of the Empire State, and the fact that her father procu
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
e. Still, I think I shall be glad to have made the journey when it is all over — I must be stronger than I was, for I bear fatigue very well now and at first I could not bear it at all. We went from Philadelphia to Baltimore, thence to Wheeling, thence to see the Manns at Antioch — they almost ate us up, so glad were they to see us. Thence to Cincinnati, where two days with Kitty Rolker, a party at Larz Anderson's — Longworth's wine-cellar, pleasant attentions from a gentleman by the name of King, who took me about in a carriage and proposed everything but marriage. After passing the morning with me, he asked if I was English. I told him no. When we met in the evening, he had thought matters over, and exclaimed, You must be Miss Ward! And you, I cried, must be the nephew of my father's old partner. Do you happen to have a strawberry mark or anything of that kind about you? No. Then you are my long-lost Rufus! And so we rushed into each other's confidence and swore, like trooper<
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
lbert Victor. Mrs. Julian Goldsmith's ball — in the evening. It is remembered that she bravely watched the dancers foot it through the livelong night, and drove home by daylight, with her poor dancing Maud ! Madame Waddington was formerly Miss King, the granddaughter of Mr. Ward's old partner. Our mother was always interested in meeting any descendants of Prime, Ward & King. With all this, she was writing letters for the Chicago Tribune and the Woman's Journal. This year of 1877 saw King. With all this, she was writing letters for the Chicago Tribune and the Woman's Journal. This year of 1877 saw the height of the Aesthetic movement. Mrs. Langtry, the Jersey Lily, was the beauty and toast of the season. Gilbert and Sullivan's, Patience was the dramatic hit of the year, and Greenery yallery, Grosvenor gallery the most popular catch of the day. She found it hard to tear herself away from England; the visit (which she likened to one at the house of an adored grandmother) was over all too soon. But July was almost gone; and the two travellers finally left the enchanted island for Holl
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
e has always been a good Catholic; he shall not die without the sacrament! On the 9th of January the King died, and the ransomed land mourned its sovereign as with one heart. Reminiscencee, p. 42S. January 12. Have just been to see the new King [Umberto I] review the troops, and receive the oath of allegiance from the army. The King's horse was a fine light sorrel — he in full uniform, with light blue trousers. In Piazza del Independenza. We at the American Consulate. Much acclamati 15. Miserable with a cold. A confused day in which nothing seemed to go right. Kept losing sight of papers and other things. Felt as if God could not have made so bad a day — my day after all; I made it. February 18. To ball at the Palace. King took Maud out in the German. February 21. The day for eating the roast lamb with the Cretan chiefs. Went down to the Piraeus warmly wrapped up.... Occasion most interesting. Much speech-making and toasting. I mentioned Felton. February 22
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
ner spoke of woman's work in Japanese literature. These talks were free to the public, and proved so popular that eight years later the same plan was carried out in the Woman's Department of the Chicago World's Fair, and again proved its excellence and value. As if all this were not enough, she must found a Literary Association among the young people of New Orleans. She named them the Pans, and among their number were several whose names have since become well known in literature. Grace King, Elizabeth Bisland, and others will remember those evenings, when their bright youth flashed responsive to the call of the elder woman of letters. In all the stress and hurry, we find this entry:--- My dear father's birthday. I left the Exposition early and walked to visit dear Marion's grave in Girard Street Cemetery. A lovely place it was. He is buried above ground in a sort of edifice formed of brick, the rows of coffins being laid on stone floors, each single one divided from thos
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
the Unitarian Church on the Sunday following, and on November 4 we started for New Orleans which we reached the next morning. We were all to be entertained, and Mrs. King, our old friend, had written me a cordial invitation to stay with her. The whole family turned out to receive us, and we were made at home at once .... Mrs. KingMrs. King had always been most kind and loyal to me. Our days in New Orleans, only six in number, were delightful. I saw most of the old friends. . . . After the accident to Mrs. King and myself, I felt much like seeking my own hearth. You will have seen or heard that a trolley car upset our carriage.... All said that it was a wonderful eMrs. King and myself, I felt much like seeking my own hearth. You will have seen or heard that a trolley car upset our carriage.... All said that it was a wonderful escape. My bruises are nearly well now, and I am able to go about as usual. New Orleans has improved much since we were there. The old mule cars have disappeared, and much of the mud. People feel very glad that the Lottery has been got rid of, but they are bitter against the sugar trust. Mrs. Walmsley received our A. A.W. ladie
262. Kenmare, Lady, II, 251, 254. Kenmare, Lord, II, 165. Kennan, George, II, 187. Kennebec River, I, 5. Kensett, J. F., I, 159. Kentucky, II, 122. Kenyon, John, I, 85. Kindergarten for the Blind, II, 119, 126, 314, 360. King, Mrs., II, 208. King, Charles, I, 16, 62; II, 9. King, Grace, II, 108. King, Rufus, I, 169. King Philip's War, I, 13. Kipling, Rudyard, II, 304. Kneisel, Herr, II, 367, 368. Knowles, F. L., II, 340. Knowles, James, II, 9. Pourtales, Count, I, 124. Poussin, Nicolas, I, 42. Powel, M. E., II, 277. Powell, Aaron, I, 303; II, 178, 182; Powell, Samuel, II, 49. Powers, Henry, I, 354. Prado Museum, II, 243. Press Association, II, 181. Prime, Ward & King, I, 16, 55, 62: II, 9. Primrose League, II, 170. Prison Discipline Society, I, 127. Prison reform, I, 127, 315, 316. Procter, Adelaide, II, 5. Providence, II, 100, 121, 126, 19&8 Provo, Bishop of, II, 138. Prussia, I, 94; II,