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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 53 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 21 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Preston King or search for Preston King in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
e fear—voted for the measure in Congress, In the House, Hannibal Hamlin of Maine, Democrat, voted for the resolution; but another Democrat from New England, John P. Hale of New Hampshire, revolted from his party. With the latter also stood Preston King of New York. In the Senate, John A. Dix of New York, an unstable politician, voted for it. joined by a sufficient number of Whigs in the Senate to carry it through. It is painful, in reading the history of that period, to see how feeble was an who followed his own conscience rather than the lead of party. Edward Brooks last evening expressed to me his warm sympathy with you. S. C. Phillips, as you May imagine, appreciates your noble position. I regret very much that Mr. Adams and Mr. King did not stand with you. Sumner defended Palfrey's vote in two articles contributed to the Courier. Dec. 23, 1847, Honor to John Gorham Palfrey. Jan. 6, 1848, Mr. Palfrey and Mr. Winthrop. They were signed with a *, but they were known t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
nominations. Over this body Salmon P. Chase presided. The men marked as leaders were Chase, Giddings, and Samuel Lewis of Ohio; Adams of Massachusetts; and Preston King, Benjamin F. Butler, D. D. Field, and Samuel J. Tilden, of New York. Both the nominating body and the mass meeting were animated by a profound earnestness. Aassociations with some leading Barnburners,—as with Theodore Sedgwick, H. B. Stanton, and D. D. Field; and after the nomination John Bigelow, S. J. Tilden, and Preston King were his correspondents. State conventions and ratification meetings of the new party now known as the Free Soil party, or Free Democracy, Sumner preferr. Sumner urged, in correspondence with Free Soilers in New York and Ohio, co-operation in issuing a national address, and received replies from Field, Tilden, and King of New York, and from Giddings. In the early part of the year Sumner thought that General Taylor could not command the votes of the Northern Whigs. He was qui
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
thought by spectators to be enjoying the classic and scholarly feast before them. Keitt, the accomplice of Brooks, sat awhile near Senator Hammond. Near Sumner sat Wilson (his colleague), Burlingame, and Lovejoy, and Senators Bingham and Preston King,—all ready to protect him. Seward and C. F. Adams were present a part of the time. The Republican senators, generally in their seats, listened with respect; but excepting perhaps Preston King, all, or nearly all, would have preferred that the speKing, all, or nearly all, would have preferred that the speech should not have been made at that time. Few of them followed a custom among senators to subscribe for copies of the speech to be franked to their constituents. Seward, without expressly objecting to the speech, called it elaborate, unsparing, and denunciatory. (Seward's Life, vol. II. p. 457.) His last adjective was misplaced. Chestnut of South Carolina followed Sumner with an outbreak of coarseness and brutality, which began with a sneer at his sufferings, and ended with a disclaimer