hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for R. H. King or search for R. H. King in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 8 document sections:

composed of the following regiments, namely, Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Jordon; Eighth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Baldwin; Third Kentucky cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel King; Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman; and Tenth Wisconsin light artillery, Captain Beebe commanding, amounting to two thousand eight hundred (2800) mounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordon,) in columns of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty mickhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirk; the Ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomel
re he was found occupying a second line of barricades, with artillery, as before, and his flanks so far extended, that it was useless to attempt to turn them. I therefore determined to break his centre. Colonel Murray, having the advance, was directed to make a disposition accordingly. The Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) was dismounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordon,) in columns of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force completely routed. The Fifth Ohio, Fifth Kentucky, and a portion of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, followed in close pursuit to Briar Creek, a distance of eight miles from the point from where the first attack was made. After burning the
oth are educated gentlemen and accomplished cavalry soldiers; both merit promotion. Lieutenant-Colonel Sanderson and his regiment, Tenth Ohio cavalry, at East-Macon; Colonel Acker and his regiment, Ninth Michigan ; and Colonel Jones, Eighth Indiana, when cut off and surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heath and his regiment, at Buckhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirk; the Ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artillery, and his lieutenants, Stetson, Fowler, and Clark, have performed their duty well, and t
rrived in front of the enemy's works around the city, on the tenth day of December. On the twelfth, by order of Major Reynolds, the battery was moved on the river-bank, opposite the head of Hutchinson's Island. From the commencing of the campaign to this date, the battery was commanded by Captain W. B. Gary, who was captured on Hutchinson's Island the twelfth, with two enlisted men. The battery then fell to my command. On the fourteenth instant, by command of Major Reynolds, I sent Lieutenant King, with a section, to report to Colonel Robinson, commanding Third brigade, First division, at Cherokee Hill. The balance of battery kept its position on the river until eleven o'clock A. M., on the twentieth instant, when I received orders to move my battery, except the section at Cherokee Hill, to the city of Savannah, where I arrived at three P. M., and went into camp on the west end of Roberts street, where the battery now lies. During the campaign, the command has consumed abou
In conclusion, I would tender to Colonel Thomas J. Jordan, Ninth Pennsylvania; Colonel Baldwin, Fifth Kentucky; Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, Eighth Indiana; Lieutenant-Colonel King, Third Kentucky cavalry, and Captains Forman and Gillmore, Second Kentucky cavalry, my heartfelt thanks for the hearty cooperation they have ever given me fifty; blankets, fifty. J. T. Forman, Captain Second Kentucky Cavalry, Commanding Regiment. Station, in the field, Georgia. Date, December 18, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonel King's Report. headquarters Third Kentucky cavalry, near Savannah, Ga., December 16, 1864. Captain James Beggs, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General First Bristment, will shortly return to their homes and firesides. The patriotic people of Kentucky will welcome them with warm hearts and open hands. Respectfully, R. H. King, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Third Kentucky Cavalry. True copy: J. S. Gray, Adjutant Third Kentucky Cavalry. Colonel Baldwin's Report. headquarters F
ms Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Jacob X Vorbor,   seaman.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. John X Neat,   seaman.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Robert X Wright,   captain maintop.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Wm. X McGinley,   cockswain.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Wm. X McGuire,   captain foretop.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Martin X King,   first-class fireman.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Saml. X Williams,   first-class fireman.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Peter X Hughes,   boatswain's mate.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. Robert X Devine,   ordinary seaman.  J. Adams Smith, paymaster.  John M. Browne, surgeon. United States steamer Kearsarge, Cherbourg, France, July 5, 1864. sir: I have the honor to
two latter wounded; Captain Fields, commanding Eleventh Alabama, Captain King, commanding Ninth Alabama, both wounded; Captain Otey, commandind States, and our own. I call attention to gallant conduct of Captain King and Lieutenant Tucker, my Aides-de-camp; Major Goggin, Inspectin was also wounded by a piece of shell striking him over the eye; Captain King, commanding Ninth Alabama, is deserving of especial praise for hnts Virginia cavalry, to march through the counties of King William, King and Queen, and Gloucester, to Gloucester Point. The object of theyal citizens whom I might find in those counties. When I arrived in King and Queen County, it was reported to me that the enemy had landed tr river with cavalry, and had harassed the citizens of Gloucester and King and Queen, in predatory excursions. I succeeded in committing to thy. Marching by easy stages, and lying over one day at Walkerton, in King and Queen County, for the purpose of resting the horses, I arrived a
tain Atwell, (killed,) and Lieutenant Caldwell, of the Twentieth, conducted themselves with soldier-like gallantry. Lieutenants King, Ray, Malone, Duguid, Felton, and Sutten, Sergeants Riddick, Ingram, Pearce, Johnson, and Dennis, privates Hays, Ellr McIntosh, A. A. G.; Major Goggin; Major McLaws; Major Edwards, A. C. S.; chief surgeon of division, Surgeon Gilmore; Captain King, who accompanied General Kershaw during the whole of his operations on the heights; Captain Costin; Lieutenant Tucker,tending their execution, in the performance of which duties he exhibited great daring, and cool, sound judgment. To Captain King and Lieutenant Tucker, Aids-de-camp, and Captain Costin, signal officer, Lieutenant Campbell, of the engineers, and Liark. Both were easily repulsed. The opposing force of the enemy, as I learned from captured officers, consisted of General King's division, of four brigades, and a battery of howitzers. One piece was captured, and about one hundred prisoners. Am