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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. King or search for W. H. King in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
vicinity, I was informed by one of the neighboring residents that the troops encountered by my battalion were Hamblin's Brigade of the 6th Corps, consisting of three regiments, of which one-half were ordered forward at each time. The information was obtained from General Hamblin himself, who further admitted that he suffered very severely and lost six colors. As I heard of but two regimental flags, I presume the others were markers' flags. Indeed, one of my men told me that he saw Lieutenant King, whose death is above-mentioned, with two markers' flags shortly before he fell. It seems scarcely possible that this battalion could have contended successfully with even a single regiment unless reduced to its own feeble dimensions. It can be explained, however, by the fact that they were thrown into some disorder by the closeness of the thicket through which they advanced, and being thus caught in detail by a sudden attack had no opportunity to recover themselves. I have thus, G