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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William H. King or search for William H. King in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
well served officially, what I desire to say most gratefully is: that our supplies whilst at Chaffin's were vastly aided and improved by the old folks at home in King and Queen, Gloucester, Mathews, Essex and Accomack and Northampton. The latter counties had to run a blockade through narrow passes in the smallest craft, at nighnt clothes and medicine and food. Essex and Mathews and Gloucester poured out their cornucopias upon us; but Oh! shall I ever forgot the little hen-coop carts of King and Queen. They were constantly coming packed to the tops of their cover-hoops always with good things from the dear mothers and sisters and wives at home! I hadappoo, and then farther South at Adams' Run, and extended from Willtown on the Edisto, to the Church Flats on the Stono, posting Willtown, the Toogadoo, the Dahoo, King's island, Glen's island, Church Flats, and the Haulover, near the mouth of the Bohickett on John's island, besides the forces in reserve at Adams' Run. It was a v
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
red by an officer of the enemy of greatly superior size and strength, in Confederate uniform, and was shot by him on the ground, after he had surrendered. Lieutenant W. H. King revenged him, and was himself killed on the instant. Sergeant C. B. Postell, with three or four others, was surrounded by a party of the enemy, and refusiHillman's Farm, or Sailor Creek, Va., April 6, 1865.: Field and Staff—Wounded—Major William S. Basinger, Lieutenant E. P. Starr, Adjutant. Company A, Lieutenant W. H. King, Commanding: Killed—Lieutenant Wm. H. King; Sergeants R. Millen, W. H. Bennett; Privates Henry Crook, E. L. Gordon, J. W. Myddleton, John Vicars. WoLieutenant Wm. H. King; Sergeants R. Millen, W. H. Bennett; Privates Henry Crook, E. L. Gordon, J. W. Myddleton, John Vicars. Wounded—Lieutenant Fred A. Tupper; Sergeant Harry H. Woodbridge; Corporal H. Barrs; Privates James Belote, J. S. Gans, J. Hitchcock, B. Newbern, J. T. Smith, S. Syntis B. Green. Company B, Lieutenant Geo. D. Smith, Commanding: Killed—Sergeants Chase B. Postell, Sim Moreton; Privates E. L. Barie, Jas. C. Bryan. Wounded—
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
ght directing the movement of his troops, was asleep in a fence corner, when mounted scouts came in to inform us that a large body of Pope's army was moving past on the Warrenton road and in the direction of Centreville. As soon as he was waked and informed of the state of affairs, Gen. Jackson sprang up and moved rapidly towards his horse, buckling on his sword as he moved and urging the greatest speed on all around him, directing Ewell and Taliaferro to attack the enemy, which proved to be King's Division. With about 20,000 men he attacked Pope's army of 77,000 soldiers, so determined was he that Pope should not escape to Centreville, there to intrench and wait for the reinforcements of McClellan then on their way to him. The attack that evening brought on the bloody battle of Groveton. I must recur to the battle of Sharpsburg, as that was one of the sternest trials to which Jackson was ever subjected. 80,000 Federal soldiers under McClellan attacked 35,000 Confederates under L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
anchorage was secured, four armed boats were dispatched with orders to capture the vessels and bring their officers, ships' papers, log-book, instruments for navigation and whaling charts to the Shenandoah. After the boats left the steamer the Confederate flag was hoisted and a gun fired. This signal, announcing the character of the warship, brought down the American flags and the seizure was immediately made. Waddell remained some days in this harbor, where he made friends with the native King, a savage. The course of the Shenandoah was thence for many days toward the north and beset with violent storms. Finally, the snow-covered Kuril Islands were sighted, and on May 31st the Sea of Okhotsh was entered under the coast of Kamschatka. A few days later the whaling bark Abigail, of New Bedford, was overtaken, captured and burned. The Shenandoah continued as far north as the mouth of Chijinsk Bay, but being forced away by the ice, she stole along the coast of Siberia on her still