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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Kirby or search for Kirby in all documents.

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s brigade. The hill was occupied by the First and Third Mississippi infantry, First regiment Texas infantry, Eighth regiment of Kentucky infantry, and a battalion of Forest cavalry, (Texas.) The hill was covered at intervals with forest and dense underbrush. I deployed company B, Eighth Missouri, Lieut. Otis commanding, as skirmishers to advance rapidly and draw their fire and ascertain their position. I afterwards deployed company G, Capt. Grier, company H, Capt. Swarthout, company E, Capt. Kirby, and company A, Capt. Johnson, with intervals of two paces, so that every advantage could be taken of trees for cover; in two instances their skirmishers and ours were occupying each side of the same tree for cover. It was here that the gallant Capt. Swarthout fell. In his efforts to keep his men under cover, he forgot himself, and received two rifle-bullets, either of which would have killed him instantly. After about an hour's hard fighting, during which time we were advancing slowly
was executed promptly, and nothing could exceed the order and firmness with which our entire line moved upon the enemy. Colonel Dickey and Lieut.-Col. Wilson, of the Fifteenth Ohio, being absent on account of sickness, the command of the regiment devolved on Major Wm. Wallace, who managed his command with promptness and skill, exhibiting throughout the bloody contest the highest traits of coolness, courage and energy. His horse was killed on the field. He had called Capts. Dawson and Kirby to his aid on the field, and they merit especial praise for their gallantry, in cheering on the regiment under a galling fire of artillery and infantry. Adjutant Taft performed his whole duty regardless of danger, and the entire regiment gave proof of its thorough discipline. To the Thirty-second Indiana too much praise cannot be awarded. Active and vigilant at every moment, Col. Harrison exhibited skill and the highest courage and coolness, in manoeuvring his command. Major Evans was